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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes I am new. I am looking into a hardy thumbnail, mainly ventrimaculatus. But I was wondering, where most of you find your frogs? I know there is alot of trading on this board, but are there any websites I can go to find the waiting lists everyone is talking about. I know Saurian.net is good, I have talked to Patrick once or twice through email and can tell he is a quality guy.

Mainly where can I find Pumilio (bastimentos var. 2 and regular bastimentos, blue jeans, blue, and especially green and blue. That is one of the most beautiful frogs I have seen.

And where do you all find D. Granuliferus, Lamasi, Imitator, Imitator Intermedius, Fantasticus, Reticulatus, Castaneoticus, Truncatus, and Trivittatus?

I know they are for the experienced, but I am not planning on getting those right off the bat, I am looking at vents, imitator, or imitator intermedius.

Any suggestions welcome and please please please, let me know where most of you have transactions, most of these frogs, from what i understand have a long waiting list. So, I figure if I get one or two of the hardier types of thumbnails prove to myself I can keep and allow them to live peacfully, then I will be ready for others when my name comes up on a list.

THank you to all for any response,
Chris Pyle
 

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If this is your first time at darts, why not try out with something easier like a bicolor, terriblis, tincs, auzerus, auratus, or leucs?? they're fairly easy to maintain from what others said. Terriblis and Bicolor could also handle some fairly large prey, so when your food supply crashes, you wouldn't have to worry much.
 

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Another great first frog (it was mine, and was recomended when I was getting into the hobby) is E. tricolor. There are a couple morphs floating around, and while they might not be the biggest or brightest, I still they they are the hardest. D. trunatus could be considered a beginner frog just as much as some of the others listed, althought it has become rather rare in the hobby. Both D. truncatus and E. tricolor fell out of the hobby do to their overpopularity at one point, and they almost were lost to the hobby for that reason. The same thing is happening to some D. tincs, and since E. tricolor and D. truncatus are now uncommon, their price has gone up.

As for being new, I'd stay away from the thumbnails, they are considered intermediate and I believe they are for good reason. I usually recomend 2 or 3 years with other D. tinctorious group dendrobates, phyllobates, and E. tricolor/E. trivittatus before moving up to thumbnails. Yes, I realise a lot of people have move up before then, but I feel you get more out of working with a variety of these "easier" species before you move up. As for eggfeeders, I'd take on 2-3 years of working with various thumbnail species. If you can successfully work with and raise D. retics, then you can work with the eggfeeders. Best first thumnail would be the imitator complex (especially D. i. imitator and D. i. intermedius) and the D. ventrimiculatus complex. Best first eggfeeder is D. pumilio 'bastimentos' the orange one. D. granuliferus, D. pumilio 'blue jean', "green/yellow basti', and 'green and blue' I'd leave for the very experienced since the captive population is extrodinarily low.

As for specifics, almost all the frogs you listed you'd need to get on a waiting list for, if they are bred at all. Patrick (saurian.net) and Thomas (pumilio.com) are two I'd recomend for your first thumbnails and/or eggfeeders (you'll have to get on waiting lists), the other species can easily be picked up off kingsnake.com or frognet.org classifieds (or form them as well). As for the ones you can't find.... it may be like that for a reason. The more advanced and rare the frog, the deeper in the hobby you need to be. The sources for these often don't advertise (they don't need to or want to be bugged by those not qualified). If you are into the hobby long enough, you get to know people and these doors will open up. Patience, practice, and experience get you far in this hobby.
 

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I always say go for leucs to start, they are great, bold, active, and have a great bird like call.

Check out some of the links in the links section and do some reading. I don't think most people realize just how small some of the frogs are. I still remember when I got my imitators. WOW they seemed so small compared to my azureus and leucs.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd have to agree with Kyle. I just got my first thumbs last week and was amazed at their size compared to the rest of my collection. I've been working with tincs and auratus for about two years now and finally was able to get my hands on some thumbs. I like Leucs and Auratus for a first frog. If you look hard enough you might be able to find some less common morphs of either one. At least then you will have a much larger and more hardy frog to start out with, and still have something that is very unique. Hope this helps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, maintaining a few different species from different sources first will allow you to build an arsenal of drugs for the frogs, and help to develop an instinct for when things just aren't right with the frogs. I'm sure thumbs are harder to keep track of than their larger cousins. We've only been doing this for a year and have so far seen three different illnesses with our frogs (each with a different species). We've got a few leucs, bicolors, some tincs, vittatus, and some auratus.

As someone pointed out, keeping multiple larger species will allow you to build relationships with others in the hobby. My frogs would probably be dead by now if it weren't for one of 'my guys.' That's a lot of money, and, since I get attatched to my stuff, a lot of heartache that was avoided because we started with baby steps.

But there's nothing wrong with getting on the lists. If your frogs are up before you're comfortable gambling your money, then you can always swap places with someone else who is further down the list and ready for them. Keeping frogs is a lot more complicated than at a glance, even if you've done your homework, and the complications just get bigger as the size and of the frog gets smaller.

There, how's that for beating a dead horse?
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, thank you for all your comments, and I won't just blow them off. I am still looking at thumbnails, but realize I need something a little larger to learn and understand what is going on. To everyone who responded, I am grateful for the info, I will be looking around for perhaps Azureus, and I will (look) at the vents. And that is it for now. Any more info is greatly appreciated.

Chris PYle
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Chris, the best thing to do would be to get on the phone with some people in your region. I'm not sure where you are in IN, but there's quite a few people within driving distance of our midwest locale. Check out the vendor feedback forum to get an idea of who to start calling. Chances are, one of the vendors there can hook you up with someone reliable who is close to you.

We rookies have it easy. You see, we get free direction from the pros who lost lots of time and money on hard learned lessons. If there's someone nearby you can similarly profit from, you may have a great chance at raising some vents right off the bat. Who knows? But do get some larger frogs set up while you're waiting for your vent tank to cycle and grow in. That way if something happens to the vents, you'll have the others to comfort you :)
 
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