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Hi all, I am an avid fan of all things amphibian, and i've have done considerable research on forums, informational websites, ect. yet there is one question that has gone unanswered. So to my question to you all:

How sensitive are amphibians to sound?

I Have a couple of terrariums in school that i've tinkered with, but have never had one at home. I have a pretty decent speaker system in my room and can cranck the sound up pretty high at times. If i'm to have a terrarium in my room i will take it easier with the sound level, but i'm still concerned. The last thing i want is an ill treated, traumatised frog of which i am to blame. Any words of wisdom are greatly appreciated.

/Bulb
 

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There is a lot of variation in how they percieve sound depending on the species in question. Some sounds can elicit a flight response and stress the frogs (See for example http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/269/1495/999.full.pdf).. your best bet is to search google scholar.

I would also keep in mind that deep bass sounds that are transferred through substrates may (note the may) be percieved differently by the frogs as some may be interpreted as the approach of a predator.

Ed
 

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Here the volume goes to "unreasonably looud" very often and i have never seen any flight-reactions. Usually there is no reaction at all and some music also triggers my pumilios. Aphex twins gets them calling every time ;-)
 

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This depends on the sounds and how they are percieved by the frogs... Not all species and not all sounds are going to elicit the same response. I was pointing out in the literature that significant stress can result from some sounds.

Even species that are considered relatively bullet proof can demonstrate significant levels of stress see for example RESPONSE OF WHITE’S TREEFROG (LITORIA CAERULE) TO COMMON HOUSEHOLD CAPTIVITY STRESSORS A Report of a Senior Study by Erin M. F If you want the nice neat pdf search the title under google scholar.

Ed
 

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Ed, would it be okay to house frogs in a high-traffic living room as long as the glass of the enclosure is fairly thick to minimize sound? I wouldn't want to kill my frogs over something as simple as that.
 

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Ed, would it be okay to house frogs in a high-traffic living room as long as the glass of the enclosure is fairly thick to minimize sound? I wouldn't want to kill my frogs over something as simple as that.
In general most dendrobatids do just fine in a high traffic conditions... The trick is to pay attention to them for behaviors that could signal a problem (for example if you read through the paper on the White's treefrogs, it indicated that stressed whites spent a lot more time in the water and didn't behave normally...

The thickness of the glass doesn't prevent transfer of vibrations.. which are likely to be more of a stressor. In some zoos, they attempt to reduce vibrations from the pumps and filters as that could be a stressor..

In reality based on watching dendrobatids on exhibit at a zoo (where people beat on the glass to try to get the frog to move) most become very acclimated quickly.. as a side note.. it could also be an indication of adaptivity to captivity (as the flighty ones died off a long time ago... reducing those genes in the captive population).

Ed
 
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