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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Many of you may have already seen these posts on the facebook groups, so this is more for those who haven't :)

I spent some time in the Cordillera Azul a little over a month ago and had the great fortune to see Ameerega silverstonei in the wild. I was never really impressed with silverstonei until I saw them in the wild. It was then that I realized how incredible this frog is. My friend Jason and I found 5 frogs on the side of a trail near some bamboo thickets. One thing that I found strange was the frogs were out and active on the surface without any recent rains. The sun was out and they were sitting in sun spots shining through the canopy. They seemed to really like the bamboo thickets and were even hiding within the bamboo tubes that had been cut by the locals and tossed to the ground (hint for anyone keeping silverstonei). I remember the first one I saw. I was walking around a bamboo stand and I see this BRIGHT neon red/orange frog hop around the bamboo and then inside of the root mass. My friend Jason and I were able to pull out the leaf litter and catch the frog. Frog number one. We took pictures and then continued searching. not far up the hill from the first frog, I found a second frog in another clump of bamboo. We managed to catch it before it got too deep into the bamboo clump. Frog 3 was found further up hill away from the bamboo just hanging out in the leaf litter. We had decided that was a successful hunt and after final photo session, we decided to move on. We has set our backpacks on the side of a half burried pile of bamboo poles next to a peaf cutter ant mound. As Jason lifted up his backpack, frog munber 4 reveals itself with a huge leap for safety. It was hiding under Jason's backpack! I quickly caught the frog before it got away and as soon as I turned around to show Jason the frog, I see an orange head pop out of a bamboo tube! Frog number 5! Wow! We had not expected to find so many frogs in this little spot! What luck! Since all the frogs pretty much looked the same, we didn't take any pictures of the other frogs we found.

We returned back to the dirt road we were following and walked a ways into the hills. We came across a SMALL creek that went into a very thick, beautiful forest. We did not find any adult frogs here, but we found tadpoles in the creek and even froglets leaving the water. The froglets were brown with a muddy orange nose and front legs. Not impressive at all, but as they grow, they turn a brilliant red or orange. Unfortunately, I couldn't get any pictures of the habitat or the froglets due to how dark it was in this spot. None of my photos turned out.

Much of the areas these frogs are found is disturbed habitat, yet they seem to be doing very well. I could hear adult males calling all over the hillsides in many disturbed places as well as good forest. I definitely don't think they are rare. I will definitely be going back to the Cordillera Azul, next time, with a video camera and hopefully get some footage of silverstonei in the wild.

Josh

silverstonei (6 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (7 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (8 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (11 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (16 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (17 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (19 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
silverstonei (22 of 23) by muddyboots_peru, on Flickr
 

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Awesome! Amazing looking frogs and badass flora!


Loading bowls and building vivs! Braaap!
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Discussion Starter #12
Very nice. I'm envious.

I went to Ecuador and didn't see any frogs. Just got Dengue fever.
Oooooo... that sucks.... Not a very pleasant experience. I do take people out to see stuff like this when they travel to Peru. I can do the same in Ecuador as well. So next time you come down, let me know!

As for the boldness of that frog in the photo, it took a few tries to get it to be that bold haha! But yes, this species can be very bold. I was shooting with a 16mm wide angle lens so to get that close up, I needed to be literally right in the frogs face! He cooperated quite well :)

Next time I go back, I hope to get better pictures of these in their habitat as well as better pictures of their habitat.

Josh
 
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