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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ameerega bassleri is a montane species of poison frog endemic to Central and Northern San Martin, Peru. Found throughout the Cordillera Oriental and the central Huallaga river valley, the geographic range of A. bassleri encompasses both lowland and highland habitat (1). While lowland populations are restricted to cool, humid areas surrounding small streams, highland populations are widely distributed, even to the extent of being found beyond 300 meters of standing water (2).

Despite its restricted range, the status of this species in the wild varies between individual populations or morphs. While the nominal or ‘Tarapoto’ morph of A. bassleri exists in large numbers throughout the Cordillera Oriental and part of the Cordillera Azul, the ‘Chrome-green’ (ie. Sisa) morph is considered highly endangered due to its limited range and fragmented habitat (3).

In the United States, three recognized morphs of A. bassleri are available for captive management by hobbyists. These include the nominal or ‘Tarapoto’ morph, also known commonly as the 'Yellow' morph, the ‘Chrome-green’ or ‘Sisa’ morph and a population of highly variable yellow and black A. bassleri endemic to a mountain range in the vicinity of Saposoa, Peru, commonly referred to as A. bassleri ‘Black’ or ‘Saposoa’.

Map of the north central cordilleras showing collection localities for A. bassleri (4)



A. bassleri ‘Tarapoto'

Most recently introduced to U.S. hobbyists in 2006 through the INIBICO project (5), the nominal or ‘Tarapoto’ morph of A. bassleri is a highly variable population, with adults displaying a range of yellow and orange coloration across the dorsum along with a reticulated sky blue venter.

Photographs:

(Adult female, submitted by stemcellular)


(Adult female, submitted by stemcellular)


(Adult female, submitted by stemcellular)


(Adult female, submitted by sports doc)


A. bassleri ‘Chrome-green’ or ‘Sisa’
(In progress - anyone interested in compiling this section?)

Photographs:

(Adults, submitted by sports doc)


(Adult male transporting eggs, submitted by sports_doc)


A. bassleri ‘Saposoa’
Most recently introduced to U.S. hobbyists in 2006 through the INIBICO project, A. bassleri ‘Saposoa’ is a highly variable population of A. bassleri, with adults displaying a range of yellow and black coloration across the dorsum along with a reticulated sky blue venter. Although slightly smaller than the nominal morph of A. bassleri, captive individuals from the ‘Saposoa’ population appear to compensate for this difference in size with their bold demeanor, continuous calling, and aggressive courtship behavior (see referenced video links below).

A. bassleri calling (video):

A. bassleri calling (video):

A. bassleri calling (video):

A. bassleri courtship (video):

A. bassleri eggs developing (video):

A. bassleri male guarding eggs (video):

A. bassleri male transporting tadpoles (video):

Photographs:


(Adult male, submitted by Dendro Dave)


(Adult male, submitted by sports_doc)


(Adult male guarding eggs, submitted by sports_doc)


(Adult male guarding eggs, submitted by stemcellular)


(Adult male guarding eggs, submitted by sports_doc)


(Adult male transporting tadpoles, submitted by sports_doc)


(Adult male transporting tadpoles, submitted by stemcellular)






(F1 froglets from 2.2 group demonstrating variation within population, submitted by sports_doc)


Related DB threads:
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/members-frogs-vivariums/37956-bassleri-appreciation-thread.html
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/members-frogs-vivariums/52562-yellow-bassleri-inibico.html
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/members-frogs-vivariums/48657-inibico-black-bassleri-eggs.html

References:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Home
(2) Jason L. Brown & Evan Twomey, Complicated histories: three new species of poison frogs of the genus Ameerega (Anura: Dendrobatidae) from north-central Peru, Zootaxa 2049: 1–38 (2009)
PDF available here: http://www.jasonleebrown.org/jasonl...Twomey_complicated_histories_Zootaxa_2009.pdf
(3) Dendrobates.org - Home
(4)Roberts, J.L., Brown, J.L., Schulte, R., Arizabal, W, and Summers, K. 2007. Rapid diversification of coloration among populations of a poison frog isolated on sky peninsulas in the central cordilleras of Peru. Journal of Biogeography 34:417-426.
PDF available here: http://core.ecu.edu/biol/summersk/summerwebpage/articles/Roberts2007_Sky peninsulas.pdf
(5) INIBICO - Home

Additional resources:
(1) Dendrobates.org - Ameerega bassleri
(2) Twomey, E., V. Morales, and K. Summers. 2008. Effects of kinship on intraspecific competition in larvae of the poison frog Ameerega bassleri (Anura: Dendrobatidae). Phyllomedusa 7: 121-126.
PDF available here: http://www.dendrobates.org/articles/Twomey_et_al2008_Kinship effects in tadpoles.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Please feel free to post any additional information, pictures, breeding data, etc. in this thread. I will add your info as necessary to the initial caresheet post. PLEASE keep comments and posts germane to the topic, ie. captive husbandry of A. bassleri. Think of this thread as real time peer-review. :)
 

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I have some questions, hopefully they can go here! Although some of this information can be patched together scouring the forum, it would be... convenient to have them all in one place.

1. Temperature/Humidity- Dendrobates.org calls this species a "montane species" found near small streams and creeks.
a. In regard to temperature and humidity what differences are there for bassleri care compared to the 'standard' temperature and humidity range (i.e. mid-upper 70's and 80+% humidity)?
b. If a lower temperature (max say 70-72) is optimal, how did you achieve this?
c. When it comes to humidity, do they seem to like it more 'wet' or with just high humidity?
d. Has anyone noticed differences in temperature/humidity requirements between the morphs?
2. Housing/Breeding-
a. What size vivariums have you successfully bred bassleri in?
b. Were they kept as pairs or in a group? (male heavy group, female heavy, even ratio)
c. Any aggression between individuals?
c. I am going to assume these frogs are terrestrial, maybe semi-arboreal?
d. Judging from the pictures they like to lay eggs either on bromeliad leaves or in a petri dish/cocohut combo, correct?
e. Was a wet/dry season used to stimulate breeding?
f. Has anyone noticed differences in housing and breeding requirements between the morphs?
3. Behavior-
a. What particular events seem most stressful to these frogs?

b. Is there a typical shyness/outgoing character that seems morph related or individual related? (aside from the 'Saposoa')
4. Feeding/Tad Care-
a. Is tadpole care the same as the 'standard' procedure? (temp, food preference differences?)

b. When froglets morph out, what is the usual timetable from springtails to melanogaster?

c. Any noticeable differences between morphs?
I really hope that these questions don't seem juvenile or ill-informed. If there is anything I forgot to ask please feel free to fill us all in.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Steve. I'm working to populate each section for the main caresheet. If anyone has info to add please post below.
 

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I apologize for the shakey camera and condensation. This was shot as the opportunity presented itself.

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I have some questions, hopefully they can go here! Although some of this information can be patched together scouring the forum, it would be... convenient to have them all in one place.

1. Temperature/Humidity- Dendrobates.org calls this species a "montane species" found near small streams and creeks.
a. In regard to temperature and humidity what differences are there for bassleri care compared to the 'standard' temperature and humidity range (i.e. mid-upper 70's and 80+% humidity)?
b. If a lower temperature (max say 70-72) is optimal, how did you achieve this?
c. When it comes to humidity, do they seem to like it more 'wet' or with just high humidity?
d. Has anyone noticed differences in temperature/humidity requirements between the morphs?
2. Housing/Breeding-
a. What size vivariums have you successfully bred bassleri in?
b. Were they kept as pairs or in a group? (male heavy group, female heavy, even ratio)
c. Any aggression between individuals?
c. I am going to assume these frogs are terrestrial, maybe semi-arboreal?
d. Judging from the pictures they like to lay eggs either on bromeliad leaves or in a petri dish/cocohut combo, correct?
e. Was a wet/dry season used to stimulate breeding?
f. Has anyone noticed differences in housing and breeding requirements between the morphs?
3. Behavior-
a. What particular events seem most stressful to these frogs?

b. Is there a typical shyness/outgoing character that seems morph related or individual related? (aside from the 'Saposoa')
4. Feeding/Tad Care-
a. Is tadpole care the same as the 'standard' procedure? (temp, food preference differences?)

b. When froglets morph out, what is the usual timetable from springtails to melanogaster?

c. Any noticeable differences between morphs?
I really hope that these questions don't seem juvenile or ill-informed. If there is anything I forgot to ask please feel free to fill us all in.
I don't have the answers to _all_ these questions, but I've got some. Also, the only bassleri I'm currently working with is the Sisa.

Reports about habitat and groups to best keep bassleri in will widely vary. After doing some research and asking some others who keep bassleri some recommend very large tanks and to keep the frogs in groups. There have been reports of success, however, in pairs or even trios in tanks as little as ten gallons largely planted with overgrown pothos. Female heavy groups seem to work best and reports from Mark Pepper suggest that only the dominant male calls and is likely to have success fertilizing eggs in any given set up.

Many people have suggested lower temperatures and higher humidity levels. When I first got my bassleri there seemed to also be a common belief that the only way to get bassleri breeding was to have a moving water feature of some sort. I have not found either of these rumors to be the case. The only water feature I've found to be necessary is a shallow water bowl in which to deposit tads (this makes tads rather easy to pull from the tank as well).

In talking to EricB at Microcosm it was suggested that there were reports of bassleri depositing tadpoles in puddles in ditches along the side of the road and laying eggs in whatever they could find (litter included). This leads me to believe that bassleri should be rather eager to breed no matter what you put in their tanks.

A few odds and ends, some male bassleri seem to like to perch themselves on a broad leaf to call to initiate courting. That's why, as suggested above, pothos has been used in my tanks and some others I've spoken to. Also, while apparently the Saposoa bassleri are rather bold, Sisa can have a tendency to be rather shy. This behavior may abate when breeding behavior is witnessed, and with the introduction of dense leaf litter and broad leafed foliage.
 

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Black bassleri tadpole feeding, or trying to anyway.

 

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This is a newly morphed black bassleri froglet. You can still see the tail.

 

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Discussion Starter #12
No larger than an adult tinc. Size is variable, but they do appreciate some height. I like to keep mine in 30G cubes or the 18 x 24 exo terras
 

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Man, I'm kinda excited to get some of these now. THese species threads are very helpfull and informative. It's hard to get a good grasp on all the aspects of a species with just one sight. here are some good compelations.
 

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Two questions on bassleri and pepperi:

how big do they get and what are the size requirements for a group of 3-5?

thanks

Adam
They are actually on the smaller to medium side. Probably closer in size to auratus adults.

I keep mine in 30-50 Gal setups.

They enjoy sturdy plants that they can climb and lots of leaf litter.
 

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I plan on putting mine in a 30gal. as well. (mine are currently in temp viv)

From UE's website....
"Bassleri adapts very well to captivity. Being large Ameerga they are capable of large jumps, but are not quite as "jumpy" as trivittata, and should be provided a relatively spacious terrarium (we recommend no less than 24"Lx16Wx16H)."
Understory Enterprises Inc. - Ameerega bassleri

For those of you that keep Black/Saposoa bassleri....do you notice a size difference or body shape difference in sexes?
I recently acquired an adult group of 5 black bassleri and I was told by a couple of people that females were larger and males were smaller. So I assumed I had 3.2 and then the 2nd largest frog started calling. That male is the only one that calls.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I plan on putting mine in a 30gal. as well. (mine are currently in temp viv)

From UE's website....
"Bassleri adapts very well to captivity. Being large Ameerga they are capable of large jumps, but are not quite as "jumpy" as trivittata, and should be provided a relatively spacious terrarium (we recommend no less than 24"Lx16Wx16H)."
Understory Enterprises Inc. - Ameerega bassleri

For those of you that keep Black/Saposoa bassleri....do you notice a size difference or body shape difference in sexes?
I recently acquired an adult group of 5 black bassleri and I was told by a couple of people that females were larger and males were smaller. So I assumed I had 3.2 and then the 2nd largest frog started calling. That male is the only one that calls.
Could be age, they could be stunted, etc., or you could have all males with one larger (dominant one would be calling) but females are typically larger among bassleri.
 

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They are actually on the smaller to medium side. Probably closer in size to auratus adults.

I keep mine in 30-50 Gal setups.

They enjoy sturdy plants that they can climb and lots of leaf litter.
I think this is actually morph specific. I've seen some pretty small "adult" bassleri like you've noted here. My Sisa bassleri, however, are almost as large to some of the giant suriname cobalt tinctorius I used to own.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jake, I think a lot of the size differences might be due to improper development and/or supplementation. The bassleri clade, specifically, seems very sensitive to such issues.
 

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Jake, I think a lot of the size differences might be due to improper development and/or supplementation. The bassleri clade, specifically, seems very sensitive to such issues.
Well, I _did_ get mine as adults from UE.... Makes sense to me!
 

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I haven't had a chance to compare males to females as both my blacks were males but they were pretty good sized. Around adult male auratus size if I remember correctly, definitely bigger then the adult luecs I had at the same time.
 
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