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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Also known as Buffalo beetles. Anyone know anything about these?
I recently started trying to culture these, but they seem to be just dying. I've got them set up like mealworms. About an inch and a half deep mix of cracked wheat and cricket diet. Half an apple on top for water. I dripped in a tiny bit of water into the grain, just to see if they needed a little more moisture but that doesn't seem to be helping. Got um at room temperature ~70°
Cracked wheat is from an amish store, so nothing too wild for pesticides (it's the same stuff my mealworms are in, and part of what I feed crickets and isopods)
 

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Try using a variety of hard vegetables, like carrot and daily given greens, instead of the rapidly perishable apple. The spoiling fruit sugars arent a good contact combination with the proteins in the cricket food, be it soy, whey or animal. The apple also dries its not a good choice

The lessers are more delicate and need more daily tending.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Try using a variety of hard vegetables, like carrot and daily given greens, instead of the rapidly perishable apple. The spoiling fruit sugars arent a good contact combination with the proteins in the cricket food, be it soy, whey or animal. The apple also dries its not a good choice

The lessers are more delicate and need more daily tending.
Thanks for the response! I didn't consider the spoiling sugers+protein! I was going off this one article I found on culturing that gave me the idea of using a whole apple half. The skin has kept it from desiccating for sure, but it could be rotting in a way I'm not noticing!
dang, I kept reading that the lessers are hardier than standard mealworms. by daily tending, do you mean switching out fresh veggies? daily greens as in enough that they can eat in a couple of hours or a surplus I should be swapping out?
 

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Im troubleshooting, but it will augment the spoilage. The greater thing is that an apple starts degrading as soon as its cut, drying out and being poor moisture source. The best thing is greens, romaine is full of water and not much else nutritionally but thats what the composites are for.

They need more micromanagement than other 'mealworm' feeder forms. The dried greens remnants dont cause too much trouble spoilage wise but its better to just pull it out and replace. I have found they dont need A Constant but it must be available daily for a few hours. Easily done.

Ventilation is key. I keep all forms in an open top container with good success. The adults do not wish to migrate away from the sustenance, harborage, warmth and breeding activity of situ.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm def grabbing me a different container and greens asap! I really appreciate your input cus everything I saw was saying they're basically invincible, so troubleshooting was nil (other than stuff on what to do with them when they're too prolific)
 

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Dont feel bad. I think they sometime receive thermal damage in shipping and store that predisposes them to a failure to thrive.
 

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Yeah its too bad the beetles arent good food. Luckily I have animals that eat pupae.

I really like beetles though. I like em all.
 

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I hope i wasnt misunderstood about romaine in the way I worded it, Enaykudusi.

Romaine is a great water keeper for bugs and lasts nicely.

The prepared chows are what we count on for nourishing the bugs and its usually a cleaner culture if you keep the green water food on the opposite end of the dry chows. Another reason for a nice space for the culture. Keep in touch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I hope i wasnt misunderstood about romaine in the way I worded it, Enaykudusi.

Romaine is a great water keeper for bugs and lasts nicely.

The prepared chows are what we count on for nourishing the bugs and its usually a cleaner culture if you keep the green water food on the opposite end of the dry chows. Another reason for a nice space for the culture. Keep in touch!
Ooooohhh. I've been covering the whole bottom of the container with grain and puting fresh veggies on top of the grain. It makes sense to try and separate it though. I guess I thought doing that, the mealworms would just mix it together eventually, but if I'm checking on um daily it would be pretty easy to keep that from happening. How would you suggest doing that? Making like 3/4 of the bin grain and the other 1/4 fresh veggies?
I made up new containers last night, and when I checked on them this morning they looked to be doing ok so far. no mass die-offs overnight so fingers crossed. I actually used cabbage cus organic lettuce is expensive right now and I didn't want to risk any pesticide residue with these guys already having a tough time.
I intended to put a pic up here of the new setup. I'll have to do that tonight
 

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Composite Chows are the cricket food, fish flakes, reptimin, rapashy bug chows. Not the grain media. I dont really measure it I just put some in and watch if its right. They need alot of grain for the harborage and living space.

It sounds like what you are doing now is good.
 
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