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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are a few threads on this, but each situation is different. While I don't have any challenging species of plants, they all started dying as of three weeks ago. As a matter of fact, I only have Pothos and Philodendrons, with another unknown viney species. All of them were doing fantastic since setting up the viv in July. I noticed that everything started to curl downward, and the leaves under cover were turning yellow and dying completely. I changed my bulb out since it was 7 months old, and it hasn't made a difference. My little viney plant is disappearing completely.


Mist: 3 times per day
Lighting: ~8.5hrs/day
Top: Glass canopy with mesh screen ventilation in the back

It's a real shame, because as simple as my tank was, in my opinion it was pretty lush and full for the plants I house. I feel badly for my auratus, as she doesn't have much cover anymore. I noticed she's a little less bold. I had been planning on redoing her tank with better plants and wood, but now I think I need to do it sooner. Do you think it could be a matter of maybe misting too much, or that the soil needs to be replaced? One thing I should state, is that for several days two weeks ago the viv wreaked of "bad dirt", that's the only way I can describe it.

I understand that such issues are hard to diagnose.
Thanks for your help,
Nick
 

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Just quickly skimmed your post and you're probably right on with the misting. Sounds quite wet and stagnant. I mist my enclosed viv once a week and it's just fine. Take some measurements before doing that but you are probably misting too much.
 

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Hey man same thiing happened to me. I trimmed my pothos(yellow leaves) stopped misting for a couple days and let my take ventalate a little more and within days it was back to normal
 

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Many plants in the viv are not compatible with fully saturated soil unless they are true aquatic plants such as anubias, bladderworts and the like.

Plants require air pockets for the roots to breath or they will rot and die as well. I only hand-mist selectively to reduce the risk of plant death from overwatering.
 

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All good info but maybe your reek of "bad dirt" should be addressed too. What do you do for drainage? False Bottom? LECA? Does your standing water ever get high enough to be touching your dirt? What is your substrate mix made of? ABG mix? Just potting soil?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the replies everyone. I guess I must be misting too much.

I am using one of those bagged soils that you buy in the reptile section, I can't remember the name. It rests on top of mesh with LECA balls underneath. The reason I guess I keep my light on for ~8.5 is because I am used to planted aquaria and anything over that in MY experience is no good.

I never misted so much that the substrate was incredibly saturated. Drainage, I thought, was pretty good in my viv.

When I redo this tank, I think I am going to use MiracleGro Organic Choice Potting Mix...I like using it in my aquariums.
 

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Thanks for all the replies everyone. I guess I must be misting too much.

I am using one of those bagged soils that you buy in the reptile section, I can't remember the name. It rests on top of mesh with LECA balls underneath. The reason I guess I keep my light on for ~8.5 is because I am used to planted aquaria and anything over that in MY experience is no good.

I never misted so much that the substrate was incredibly saturated. Drainage, I thought, was pretty good in my viv.

When I redo this tank, I think I am going to use MiracleGro Organic Choice Potting Mix...I like using it in my aquariums.
Potting mix holds way too much water.
The mix you got, if it is mainly peat moss, will hold too much as well.
You could try ABG mix and put half-sphagnum moss in it and also let your tank rest in between misting. Daily overall misting without 'dry spells' of at least 2 weeks or so isn't good for the plants in the viv since it lets too much water build up in the soil no matter how good your substrate is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Potting mix holds way too much water.
The mix you got, if it is mainly peat moss, will hold too much as well.
You could try ABG mix and put half-sphagnum moss in it and also let your tank rest in between misting. Daily overall misting without 'dry spells' of at least 2 weeks or so isn't good for the plants in the viv since it lets too much water build up in the soil no matter how good your substrate is.
2 weeks of a dry spell? Wow. Wasn't aware of that! Here I was, worrying when I am not home for 2 days about not misting.

Thanks for the advice. I'm going to have to give my viv an overhaul one weekend when I'm not working.
 

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Mist: 3 times per day
Nick
Big problem for orchids. If you don't have circulation in your tank to allow an orchid roots to properly drain, they will rot in no time. No circulation = no orchids, long term. I recommend jewels , as they love low light and tolerate high humidity. They are terrestrial.

Seems like you've gotten the point on lighting as well - 12 hours on, 12 hours off is proper for plant growth.
 

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2 weeks of a dry spell? Wow. Wasn't aware of that! Here I was, worrying when I am not home for 2 days about not misting.

Thanks for the advice. I'm going to have to give my viv an overhaul one weekend when I'm not working.
Now, when I say that, keep in mind in the rainforest there are empty seed pods, tree holes and other things that retain water, which help the frogs. These stay filled with water during these 'dry spells', which help the plants. I keep a seed pod coated in silicone on the outside in the substrate filled with water during this time, and I only hand mist things like ferns very superficially.
I have a lot of begonias in my tank and they cannot take too much water, so this is always the way I operate.
 

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Dont blow off the more light comment.
Ive been growing everything from bonsai to mushrooms. 12 hours light on 12 hours light off.
Also you should amend your soil to be lighter and less dense. I use reptile bedding (fir bark, peat) and add calcined clay, coco fiber and some spag moss. you should be able to soak the mix,scoop it up with your hands and squeeze it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Big problem for orchids. If you don't have circulation in your tank to allow an orchid roots to properly drain, they will rot in no time. No circulation = no orchids, long term. I recommend jewels , as they love low light and tolerate high humidity. They are terrestrial.

Seems like you've gotten the point on lighting as well - 12 hours on, 12 hours off is proper for plant growth.
Will take that into consideration, most definitely. First things first, is when I get home I am going to click my timer on for another 3.5 hours.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Dont blow off the more light comment.
Ive been growing everything from bonsai to mushrooms. 12 hours light on 12 hours light off.
Also you should amend your soil to be lighter and less dense. I use reptile bedding (fir bark, peat) and add calcined clay, coco fiber and some spag moss. you should be able to soak the mix,scoop it up with your hands and squeeze it out.
Will not, by any means. Like I said, I was stuck in the aquaria mindset. While a 10-12hr photoperiod is generally the norm, I have been more accustomed to a shorter lighting period to avoid algae outbreaks, yet still get great plant growth.

Yeah, I'll grab a photo tonight.

Here is a pic from my viv thread:

http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/560608-post37.html

Despite being simple, my plants were healthy and there was a lot of density in the back middle portion of my tank. When I get home tonight I'll show you what my tank has become.
 

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do you have ANY means to remove excess water from that tank? Bulkhead,, anything?
After a few months, your water level has certainly risen into your substrate layer, and could be causing root rot, which would cause the symptoms you are seeing in your plants
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@ §lipperhead, I hope that isn't sarcasm :D. I am often insecure about my tank due to the impressive ones that people set up on here for their darts. Thanks for the words. Also, after this die-off, I don't think she's too satisfied!

@ frogparty, None. Only means are evaporation. I guess since July, things tend to build up...
 

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@ §lipperhead, I hope that isn't sarcasm :D. I am often insecure about my tank due to the impressive ones that people set up on here for their darts. Thanks for the words. Also, after this die-off, I don't think she's too satisfied!

@ frogparty, None. Only means are evaporation. I guess since July, things tend to build up...
I use baked clay pebbles called Hydroton to provide an airspace underneath the substrate.

You can reuse what you have if you put the little frog in QT with a lot of leaf litter and put her hut in there with her, then take all that stuff out and amend it with things like small bits of charcoal and long-fiber sphagnum moss. Let it sit out and dry on trays for a few days, then put it back without packing it down with your hands, on top of a 2-inch layer of clay pebbles. I divide the clay pebbles from the substrate with a fine screen mesh.

I provide drainage with a capped plastic tube disguised in one corner of the tank. It goes all the way to the bottom, past the soil and clay. I put an elongated seed pod over the top to cap it. People are always asking me, "what that is growing next to the plants?". I smile inside and tell them it's an empty seed pod covering the drainage tube. :rolleyes:
 
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