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The problems with "coco fiber, sphagnum and bio soil for interior plants" are:

-- sphagnum, unless milled and used in small quantities, holds way too much water for viv conditions, and leads to premature breakdown of the mix. I expect my substrate to not be the first point of failure in the viv over time.

-- houseplant potting mix is sometimes a peat based mix, often with perlite (a possible choking/impaction hazard) and/or fertilizer (frogs don't tolerate nitrogenous contaminants well). If it is a heavier 'black dirt' (sedge peat, I think this is) or field strip topsoil mix, I don't know that there's enough use of this in dart vivs to determine how it is going to behave over time. I can't imagine it will drain well.

People do somtimes adulterate ABG with coco fiber, I guess with tolerable results. I'm not a fan of the stuff, as it has a tendency toward excessive chronic mold and has weird moisture holding properties (it is either mud, or dusty dry). Maybe use in a mix moderates these properties.

A viv mix ideally has a lot of open space in it for microfauna to colonize and for air to move through; this last bit is necessary since the water additions to the viv are best based on the needs of the frogs (daily watering sessions, at minimum) rather than the needs of the plant roots or microfauna. Adding water based on the needs of the plant roots complicates things; it is then a plant terrarium that happens to have frogs in it (not uncommon, unfortunately) rather than a frog viv that is designed first and foremost for frog care.

ABG is the go-to mix for one's first viv, IMO. It is foolproof.
 
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Just as a note, not all the types of chlorines that municipal services use to purify tap water will evaporate; chlorine will, but chloramine will not. Found this out the hard way with my sourdough starter.
Chloramine will evaporate if exposed to UV light. I use filtered spring water, but in a pinch, I will fill up a clear pitcher, and set it in an open sunny window for 24 hours. I just hate using our tap water for anything, because we live in Texas, and it's got so much limestone in it. I have to run vinegar through my appliances monthly, and my glassware still looks frosted. On the plus side, none of us have osteoporosis 🤷‍♂️
 

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Chloramine will evaporate if exposed to UV light. I use filtered spring water, but in a pinch, I will fill up a clear pitcher, and set it in an open sunny window.
Curious if you've measured the water treated in this way. Glass blocks UV up to about 320nm, and the dissociation of chloramines occurs mostly at 245nm to 365nm, and at higher doses than needed for even water disinfection.

Carbon filtration with specialty chloramine filters -- used for RO pretreatment -- does remove chloramine if someone wanted to do so. These are tested for this use, and I've used them and tested them and found them to work in very high chloramine conditions -- springtime bacterial increases in municipalities that use surface water.
 

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Curious if you've measured the water treated in this way. Glass blocks UV up to about 320nm, and the dissociation of chloramines occurs mostly at 245nm to 365nm, and at higher doses than needed for even water disinfection.

Carbon filtration with specialty chloramine filters -- used for RO pretreatment -- does remove chloramine if someone wanted to do so. These are tested for this use, and I've used them and tested them and found them to work in very high chloramine conditions -- springtime bacterial increases in municipalities that use surface water.
I was about to say something similar, but they specified they place it next to an open window.
 
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I was about to say something similar, but they specified they place it next to an open window.
In a clear pitcher, yes. Plastic blocks about as well as glass, for most plastics, and none are more than about 60% transmissive at the thickness of a pitcher, and screen cuts out about half, so my concern about someone trying this and harming frogs with untested tap water still exists. I'd be very interested in knowing what the measured reduction rate with this method is, though, as it is useful info.
 

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Curious if you've measured the water treated in this way. Glass blocks UV up to about 320nm, and the dissociation of chloramines occurs mostly at 245nm to 365nm, and at higher doses than needed for even water disinfection.

Carbon filtration with specialty chloramine filters -- used for RO pretreatment -- does remove chloramine if someone wanted to do so. These are tested for this use, and I've used them and tested them and found them to work in very high chloramine conditions -- springtime bacterial increases in municipalities that use surface water.
In a clear pitcher, yes. Plastic blocks about as well as glass, for most plastics, and none are more than about 60% transmissive at the thickness of a pitcher, and screen cuts out about half, so my concern about someone trying this and harming frogs with untested tap water still exists. I'd be very interested in knowing what the measured reduction rate with this method is, though, as it is useful info.
Ah interesting I didn't realize plastic did the same thing. Good to know!
 
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In a clear pitcher, yes. Plastic blocks about as well as glass, for most plastics, and none are more than about 60% transmissive at the thickness of a pitcher, and screen cuts out about half, so my concern about someone trying this and harming frogs with untested tap water still exists. I'd be very interested in knowing what the measured reduction rate with this method is, though, as it is useful info.
I mean, you raise some good points. While Chlorine interacts with UVB and UVC wavelengths, Chloramine reacts with UVA and some visible light. Both UVA and visible light penetrate clear plastic (about 50% of UVA, and about 70-75% of Visible Light Spectrum).

As far as decay rates, there would be some variables. Water temperature, other impurities (like calcium and copper that attenuate UVA), and the type of Chloramine that was added. Monochloramine (NH2Cl), Dichloramine (NHCl2), Trichloramine (NCl3), aka Nitrogen Trichloride, all decay at slightly different rates based on the strength of the chemical bonds between Nitrogen and Chlorine molecules. It's been a while since I took a bio-chem class, so I don't remember which would decay slower, but different water companies use different treatment methods.

Now, the type of plastic could play a role here as well, as UV stabilized plastics have added ingredients that throw the decay rate off as well. Some UV stabilizers like rutile titanium oxide, which is effective in the 300-400 nm range, would all but stop chloramine decay except at the waters surface; while Hydroxyphenylbenzotriazole, which is more common in clear plastics, just protect polymers from degradation, not penetration.

You could also argue that the intensity of sunlight would be the most important factor, as UV indexes can range based on time of day, cloud cover, and elevation above sea level. The strength of UV radiation is calculated for several wavelengths between 280 and 400 nm. UV intensity increases about 6% per kilometer elevation above sea level. Clouds absorb UV radiation, reducing ground-level UV intensity.

With all of these variables, the formula you asked for starts to become a bit complex. So to address your concerns I will amend my previous recommendation from "24 hours" to "48 hours, if it's cloudy outside."

Or you could have just admitted that you didn't notice I said "an open" window, instead of doubling down. But hey, it was fun replying either way.
 

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Or you could have just admitted that you didn't notice I said "an open" window, instead of doubling down.
I'm not interested in playing that game, but if you can offer some measurements -- actual data -- on how well this method works, people who try it will benefit from it. All we're interested in is making sure we offer safe recommendations for people's animals.
 
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