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Discussion Starter #1
Originally I was not planning on adding any fans or air circulation to my 29G Paludarium, but now I think it might be a good idea. [ Link to my build is at bottom of this message. ] I did watch James67's amazing fan how-to video.

Important note, this is not a tropical viv. This is a paludarium for a firebelly newt. The max temp I plan for is 68-70 F (light fixture heat may be a problem, although it will be raised several inches above tank lid). However, it seems to me that regardless of whether it's "temperate" or "tropical", a humid enclosure should have good air circulation for the health of the plants and animals.

I'm a noob at all of this, and I imagine that a paludarium will have slightly different conditions than say a viv for pdf's. Be warned I have a billion questions because I am literally the noobest of noobs regarding technical vivs. :eek: At one point I thought I could have a section of mesh along the back of the lid to allow natural circulation, but I do want there to be a decent amount of humidity so I can get good plant and moss growth so I am worried that a mesh strip wouldn't hold enough moisture in...I am not sure how to balance the humidity/temp/circulation etc...it's all very intimidating actually :confused:

- do you think that a 29G build such as mine requires fans for circulation?
- or do you think that a strip of fiberglass window screen (or several large holes with screen) across the top lid at the back would be enough circulation?
- is the idea with fans to simply MOVE the air? OR is it to EXCHANGE the air with fresh air from outside the tank?
- what would be the ideal cfm's and how many fans, if I were to go with fans? (I like the idea of the small 40mm fans in james67's video...maybe like 2 or 3 of those?)
- this isn't super high tech so do I really need a fan controller?
- should the fans turn off at night?

If I do use fans, I plan to build them into a custom part of the tank lid that I will be making.

The tank lid will be 2 panels of glass (that came with the tank) and then for the back section instead of the crappy black plastic piece that came with it I think I'll do a plexiglass strip. Near one side of the plex strip I will drill a hole or notch to allow the water pump power cord. Then I was visualizing near that side and the other side I would drill holes about the size of the round part of the fan housing, and mount the fans vertically, pointing straight down into the tank. Since I know zero about any of this, I was thinking that pointing two fans down into it would get good air movement, but if the idea (as in my question earlier) is to exchange air, maybe it would be good to point one fan down, and have the fan on the other end of the lid pointing up, so one is forcing air in and the other is forcing air out. That would be some extreme ventilation, but I don't know if that's the idea and/or if that would destroy the humidity balance.

Sorry this was so long and rant-ish but hopefully you made it this far and don't mind helping a noob out :confused: :)

My build:
29-gallon-paludarium-build-post-i-go-details-very-pic-heavy
 

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Well for the fans there are many routes that you could go just using a simple fan that you buy and screening it off on both sides and placing it in the tank that would just have air movement inside if closed off. Or the pvc typr which you could do a fan that is outside the tank in a u patten but in between 2 peices and would circulate or want it coller you could do the fan pulling in or pushing out either would suffice for colling it down.

Right now i have 4 fans all in separate tanks but on 1 fan controler module and runs on 1 plug in. it cost me about 40 dollars for the whole setup and is super easy for installation if you want the info i can PM you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I happened across these zoo med fans today that may or may not have have some applications for certain vivs. They do not move a ton of air either which is prolly more on the plus side than negative
Wow, thanks for that! That looks pretty neat, I will look into it more and the possibility of connecting it to a tube that runs into the viv. The thing I like about something like that is it's all prefabricated and wired, so I don't need to worry about things like wiring correctly to the right power converter, etc. Gives me ideas..I'll check around and maybe there are similar solutions, even made for what I need perhaps! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I am really liking the idea of combining these products into a system, what do you think:

One fan controller (which is made to control 1 OR 2 fans) **** Important note! - the pic they show for this controller is wrong apparently...if you click on the second pic of the product you will see it is different...a reviewer of the product said the default product pic is wrong, but the rest are the correct one. Also I can't see the power input area on this controller so i'm not sure how i would connect the ac adapter or if there even is a way to do so

And one splitter which is compatible i believe with the controller above for 2 fans

And 2 of these little fans

Problem is I am not sure if the controller and splitter are compatible with the tiny fans (maybe the controller is only made for big fans?)

And then of course I would just directly connect a 12v power supply to the controller

-- also I realized after doing some research, that I would probably want a circulation system that just moves the air internally without drawing air into the tank, so something like james67's backpack system might be good. Do you guys think I am on the right track here?

thanks
 

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sorry i hadnt responded earlier.

before you go jumping in consider your options. forced ventilation is great if you can constantly provide moisture to combat the dry air you'll be pushing through the tank.

internal circulation is much better suited for the terrarium (in most cases) IMO.

james
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
sorry i hadnt responded earlier.

before you go jumping in consider your options. forced ventilation is great if you can constantly provide moisture to combat the dry air you'll be pushing through the tank.

internal circulation is much better suited for the terrarium (in most cases) IMO.

james
Thanks for the reply, I think I will go with the internal circulation as you recommend. I have an air conditioner in the same room so the forced ventilation would be a constant disadvantage by removing humidity. However with the closed tank in general I will have trouble keeping the temp down for my newt.

*edit*

ACTUALLY I just thought of something - It just occurred to me that I could make a hybrid system that would allow me to go internal circulation OR forced ventilation, so I can adjust temperature and humidity as needed. It just so happens that the fan assembly I was going to construct would very easily allow me to do this...in fact I don't even need to change the design at all! Details will be in my paludarium build thread as I progress. Thanks again!
 

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HEH.. just realized this was an old post... oh well the more information the better :p

Just an extra 2 cents.

I have a 36 gallon bowfront with 5 firebelly newts and it's got a ton of air flow straight from outside the tank. Whether you have Japanese or Chinese Firebelly Newts; they should spend the majority of their adult life in the water. So surface humidity may not be as huge as a concern as it is for PDFs. I know I don't worry about it.

4 - 92 mm fans for cooling in the summer 2 in 2 out with speed control and on paired switches. (I don't have AC). Only section that is covered is where the lights are. (I can show you pictures of my custom hood build if you are interested)

I don't know if you are new to FBN but here are a few pointers:
  • More water the better, forget land.
    -just a small out cropping of wood or stone
    -or even just floating plants that are sturdy enough to support their weight. I have sort of a flooded beach
  • floating plants are practically a must.
  • like you said max temp 70 (JapaneseFBN withstand heat a little higher than that a little better than the ChineseFBN but not worth pushing your luck)
  • chopped earth worms should be the staple diet for them. (from experience don't get red wigglers they let out this yellow stuff that supposedly tastes bad that makes the newts spit them right out, night crawlers are the way to go)
  • there is a caudate forum you should visit if you have more questions on a build and care for your FBN. PM me if you want to know the forum (I'm not sure if I can post it on here)

I'm including a few links to a care sheets to point you in the right direction.
C. Orientalis
Cynops pyrrhogaster
 

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Discussion Starter #10
HEH.. just realized this was an old post... oh well the more information the better :p

Just an extra 2 cents.

I have a 36 gallon bowfront with 5 firebelly newts and it's got a ton of air flow straight from outside the tank. Whether you have Japanese or Chinese Firebelly Newts; they should spend the majority of their adult life in the water. So surface humidity may not be as huge as a concern as it is for PDFs. I know I don't worry about it.

4 - 92 mm fans for cooling in the summer 2 in 2 out with speed control and on paired switches. (I don't have AC). Only section that is covered is where the lights are. (I can show you pictures of my custom hood build if you are interested)

I don't know if you are new to FBN but here are a few pointers:
  • More water the better, forget land.
    -just a small out cropping of wood or stone
    -or even just floating plants that are sturdy enough to support their weight. I have sort of a flooded beach
  • floating plants are practically a must.
  • like you said max temp 70 (JapaneseFBN withstand heat a little higher than that a little better than the ChineseFBN but not worth pushing your luck)
  • chopped earth worms should be the staple diet for them. (from experience don't get red wigglers they let out this yellow stuff that supposedly tastes bad that makes the newts spit them right out, night crawlers are the way to go)
  • there is a caudate forum you should visit if you have more questions on a build and care for your FBN. PM me if you want to know the forum (I'm not sure if I can post it on here)

I'm including a few links to a care sheets to point you in the right direction.
C. Orientalis
Cynops pyrrhogaster
Thank you for your help and info. I almost didn't see this because I had unsubscribed from this thread a long time ago, yet I happened to notice that a new post was made because I was browsing the newest posts section of the forum! I appreciate all the suggestions and info. I've had my FBN for probably 15+ years (it's been so long I simply can't even make a real estimate). I'd be interested in seeing a pic of your custom tank hood. I build a custom tank lid also, but I think I need to upgrade the fans (or at least add 2 more). See you around the forum!
 

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I need to get the pics off of the camera but I'll be sure to show you.
 
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