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Hi I tried adding an African Violet to my new vivarium and within a few days I noticed the leaves were getting gray. Should I pull it and forget about including it? How can I resolve the issue? Is it a scorching of the leaves, or fungal growth from too much moisture? Thanks in advance.

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Ricky
 

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I’m not a plant specialist either, but in my limited experience some plants look worse before they look better when first being introduced to their new home. I think it’s a bit of an acclimation period.
 

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If I leave it in there will it perish?

Ricky
They’re pretty tough plants, but I suspect it will slowly decline and will not bloom for you. The leaf issue you’re seeing looks fungal and likely caused by water sitting on the leaves, and while some plants will acclimate, I don’t think the odds are good with this one.

Actually, if you care about this plant, I would recommend removing it, finding the healthiest mature leaf that you can, wrapping the stem in a little sphagnum, and planting that in the vivarium. African violets propagate easily from leaves, and the moist conditions will encourage it to root. The young plantlet may have the best chance of acclimating to the humid conditions.
 

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Hi I tried adding an African Violet to my new vivarium and within a few days I noticed the leaves were getting gray. Should I pull it and forget about including it? How can I resolve the issue? Is it a scorching of the leaves, or fungal growth from too much moisture? Thanks in advance.

View attachment 304471

Ricky
This is also happening to my african violote.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They’re pretty tough plants, but I suspect it will slowly decline and will not bloom for you. The leaf issue you’re seeing looks fungal and likely caused by water sitting on the leaves, and while some plants will acclimate, I don’t think the odds are good with this one.

Actually, if you care about this plant, I would recommend removing it, finding the healthiest mature leaf that you can, wrapping the stem in a little sphagnum, and planting that in the vivarium. African violets propagate easily from leaves, and the moist conditions will encourage it to root. The young plantlet may have the best chance of acclimating to the humid conditions.
Thanks, I have taken it out and cut 2 leaves. I wrapped one in sphagnum and put it into the vivarium, the other one I put into my sphagnum growout bin.

I am also a little concerned for this Marcgravia rectiflora. I had it in a growout bin with sphagnum for about 3 weeks and noticed it had some good roots on it so I decided to set the base in the ABG and lean it against the wall. The leaves are starting to look a little curled, do you think it will be fine? It is located at the back of the vivarium so when it mists it does not get very wet. I have been hand misting it to get it settled in.
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Ricky
 

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Thanks, I have taken it out and cut 2 leaves. I wrapped one in sphagnum and put it into the vivarium, the other one I put into my sphagnum growout bin.

I am also a little concerned for this Marcgravia rectiflora. I had it in a growout bin with sphagnum for about 3 weeks and noticed it had some good roots on it so I decided to set the base in the ABG and lean it against the wall. The leaves are starting to look a little curled, do you think it will be fine? It is located at the back of the vivarium so when it mists it does not get very wet. I have been hand misting it to get it settled in.
View attachment 304472

Ricky
Looks fine to me. Marcgravia leaves want to shingle, so they will curl if they don’t have a flat surface to climb. Once it attaches itself to the background the new leaves should lay flat.
 

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I don't have any frogs in my tank so take this for what it is. I have two different species of african violets in my tank planted in the driest party of my tank. They've been moved from two different thanks so I've had these plants for several years. My current tank stays pretty humid and gets regularly watered from my misting system. They've not had any issues and, during the summer, usually flower once or twice. I'm sure if I moved then into a much wetter spot they'd die. If you have a spot that stays a bit dryer I'd suggest trying them. They're beautiful. Mine are about the size of my fist. My local greenhouse had them listed as minis.
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African violets do not like water on their leaves typically and spotting occurs.

Humidity could be a problem but I wouldn't be too worried about it. 80% is often what one would shoot for (minimal 65 -70), so not as high as what some keep their set ups. I have kept them in terrariums that maintained 90% without issue (as long as some air movement). When properly cared for African violets will bloom basically all year (fertilization and good lighting). Soil should be maintained moist but not soggy. Most of my African violets are set up to water wick from a reservoir or in the typical "self watering" violet pot. I have had mine for many years but I do have an individual in my family (Mother) that had 200 something at one time. They are a very tough plant and can be mistreated and still spring back. Heck repotting I may cut all roots off, scrape the neck with a dull knife and shove into new soil and it never looks worse for wear.

The minis will stay fairly small if you pot correctly. Will get a little larger also if you give them the space but will still retain a small leaf structure and smaller blooms.
 
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