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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I just noticed one of my mint terribilis appears to have an injury. It is in the crease between her left back leg and body. I can’t imagine how it would have happened. I looks like it’s a puncture and her insides are coming out. I really hope that is not the case. Anyone have any idea or advise on how to treat

?




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Ah jeez. Have you looked for an arav vet in your area?

This pic is like the only time ive ever wished i was looking at a parasite.

Its important it not dessicate. To advise on this would be stepping over the squiggley line of practicing veterinary medicine.

I think it could be fixed tho. There is a chance if put back in it could stay.
 

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If you cant find an arav vet call around and see if you can find a practice with a doc that would be interested in trying to help.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I caught her and put her in a deli cup and rinsed with some almond leaf tea. Just thinking it was better than nothing. These frogs have been in the same tank for years. I am baffled about what could have caused this. I put her back in the tank, I figured her stress level might be heightened and not beneficial to remove her. She did give me a good fight when I caught her so she is strong.


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It might be better to find something big enough to put some tented magnolia leaves or equivelent, on moist paper towels so she doesnt fight containment. Its much better if the frog can be encouraged to hide quietly. Darkening a portion of the hospital tank with a dark cloth or taped dark paper.
 

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Im at work sorry for the multiples. It would be good to put a stable water puddle feature. Petri lid, shallow wasabi dish, lid that wont be too flimsy, etc for her to access at will.
 

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I just read you put her back due to stress. Its a valid option imo.
 

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Prepare a hospital tank with encourage-to-repose feature more substantial than deli, with the hi probability of future necessary Q.

And this is a shot in the dark, if you have a piece of mopani wood, get it out. They often have (extremely) sharp, stiff burrs in recesses.
Accidents happen.
 

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To help us understand the situation better, @jennifer7799, please post a picture of your vivarium (so these questions and suggestions aren't shots into the dark), and info on your humidity in the tank, temperature, and the like.

Thanks,

Gastrotheca
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Crested Gecko 0.2.0
 

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I just thought the hazard of that particular wood type, was worth noting, as shots in the dark have been known to hit center.

Fingertips along frequent and or potential passage and segway areas, interiors of hovels, and especially spaces between immobile artifact can reveal culprit adversive contacts that bypass a visual. But i wouldnt create that disturbance currently with the animal in its tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for the feedback. I have had this tank set up for 20 years. It’s been revamped multiple times but the same large piece of mopani has been glued to the background for all these years. Most of it is covered with moss but I don’t doubt that there are parts that may have developed sharper edges. I am going to watch her and check into a vet in the area if there isn’t improvement. I worry about infection so I will set up a more sanitized tank so she won’t be stressed. Lights are out in my tanks right now so I can’t take a pic but the temps are a bit cooler right now about 68-70 F and not sure about exact humidity. I would say 70%.


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Hmm, well, its a Thing. Repeat contact encounters in an enclosed space is a thing. Incremental changes over time, whether by an increase of girth where unfortunate physic occurs, a spikey shard is exposed, an entrance hole traps a foreleg against body, it can happen.

You have been at this a long time. Im sure you are quite able to address your own instincts and weigh information.

Its probably not an option to pull out the mopani but maybe you can doctor it up, clot over a bad spot or whatever you may find, with some clay, moss, wet lump of paper towel for a quick bandaid, stuck between a wall and a sharp place.

All the best wishes to you and your guy. Please keep in touch.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hmm, well, its a Thing. Repeat contact encounters in an enclosed space is a thing. Incremental changes over time, whether by an increase of girth where unfortunate physic occurs, a spikey shard is exposed, an entrance hole traps a foreleg against body, it can happen.

You have been at this a long time. Im sure you are quite able to address your own instincts and weigh information.

Its probably not an option to pull out the mopani but maybe you can doctor it up, clot over a bad spot or whatever you may find, with some clay, moss, wet lump of paper towel for a quick bandaid, stuck between a wall and a sharp place.

All the best wishes to you and your guy. Please keep in touch.
I may not have chosen the best words in my response earlier. I meant that you made a good point and that it is very possible that the wood developed sharp spots over time. It is actually likely. I can’t imagine anything else in that tank other than that piece of wood that could have caused the damage.


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Hi Jennifer, no i got it. In my post i described some examples of various mishap that has occur in even established situ, with animals that had been present for signficant periods. The sentiment (not yours, but common) "It never happened before.."
does not have value. Precautionaries in environment builds are a tenet in zoo architecture, as actions and contacts in a closed space increase odds.
The burrs on mopani are tough, startlingly sharp, and exaccerbated by the weight of the wood. I always ground them down or snipped them when recieved. They were popular because of their aesthetic.

I have known of cichlid shearing a side of flesh off, baby basilisk lacerated, i suspect dashing under seeking shelter, getting caught.

Perhaps a bad spot has been uncovered thru time and moss cover changes.

I wish i could suggest a non medicated hydrophilic gel or agent to keep that bulge of bowel protected till you get to treatment, but i cannot. Clean Humidity is a real friend here.
 

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The sensitivity of terribilis to contact moisture is a real catch 22 here. I hope you can find treatment very soon.
 
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