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I got a few plant clippings of various vining plants (Trichosalpinx chamaelepanthes, medinilla sedifolia, peperomia red panama, peperomia pepperspot, pilea baby tears) and I wondering what the best way for me to acclimate them to my new vivarium would be?

Some of the pilea baby tears already have begun to "melt" from being too wet (I think), so to moved them onto the cork.

I just added the vining plants, and I just kinda gently placed them against the background cork/moss slurry where I want them to eventually grow in.

Will the slurry be too wet for them? Right now, everything is gently resting in place, and I'm carefully hand misting the tank. Here are some pictures of what I'm taking about:

https://imgur.com/gallery/bzoJxD4

Any other advice is appreciated. I haven't been great growing plants in the past.
 

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Greetings,

Live moss/moss slurry is not the best medium for rooting cuttings. Mosses are not passive fixtures - they are organisms that can defend their territory and they can excrete substances that inhibit higher plant growth.

Bare, aged wood, kept barely moist is a decent substrate for epiphytic cuttings and fully cured (dead) sphagnum (it should be pale beige) is another option. Cuttings need moisture to root but they should not be kept constantly soggy - this will encourage rot at the points of injury from the cut.

Many people have smaller tanks or bins they use for growing-out cuttings. In a grow-out tank you can coddle cuttings until they've started to re-root before putting them in the main viv.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Greetings,

Live moss/moss slurry is not the best medium for rooting cuttings. Mosses are not passive fixtures - they are organisms that can defend their territory and they can excrete substances that inhibit higher plant growth.

Bare, aged wood, kept barely moist is a decent substrate for epiphytic cuttings and fully cured (dead) sphagnum (it should be pale beige) is another option. Cuttings need moisture to root but they should not be kept constantly soggy - this will encourage rot at the points of injury from the cut.

Many people have smaller tanks or bins they use for growing-out cuttings. In a grow-out tank you can coddle cuttings until they've started to re-root before putting them in the main viv.

Ok thanks. I see people put it zip lock bags with moist sphagnum moss until it starts to root again. Is this what you would recommend?
 

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I see people put it zip lock bags with moist sphagnum moss
A ziplock is cheap/easy way to create a high-humidity enclosure - but they can sometimes be a little too enclosed so just check your cuttings often if you put them in a ziplock. A plastic food container (togo food, butter dish, even a plastic cup with lid) will keep humidity up but not be as liable to collapse on the cuttings they way a ziplock will.
 

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What we recommend is a grow-out tank. This is usually a fish tank with a glass cover (no incandescent lights, too hot.)

1) Many of us root the cuttings in small net pots or clay pots because they breathe. Use a loose mix but not standard potting soil. I use "dirty moss" (chopped sphag/coir/orchid bark);
2) No need to water the pots often. If you use capillary matting or leca on the bottom, you can water this substrate layer to keep the humidity high. Use good, aged water;
3) Plants root faster with gentle bottom heat;
4) Do not wait till the plants get big! New growth is a sign of rooting, that is when plants should be gently replanted. But do not start moving them around, that may shock the plants.

Hope this helps.
 
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