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Given that large portions of the country are controlled by left wing insurgents, drug barons and right wing vigilantes...all of whom are armed, dangerous and not exactly playing by the Geneva Convention...you'll be doing good to smuggle yourself out of the country in one piece...let alone frogs.

Bill
 

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Bill is right, and kidnapping is also a major industry, you would be lucky to leave alive, let alone getting frogs through customs as they are going to search you more carefully due to the drugs in Columbia
 

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mydumname said:
Someone said that something about smuggling frogs from Columbia being extra risky. Can someone elaborate on this as to why it is extra dangerous?
The State Department has a good website for travel info. Here is the Columbia information:
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_941.html
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_t ... _1090.html

I don't have the latest version, but Fielding's publishes a great travel book called The World's Most Dangerous Places that talks about travel to dangerous countries and gave Columbia a 5/5 rating based on being a dangerous place to go. When I was in the service, I had a soldier from Columbia who had to go back home for a funeral who said the situation was extremely tense. To get him permission to go, we had to get all sorts of crazy permission from very high. He was a local and after that trip didn't want to go back until the situation stabilized. Similarly, eastern Peru has some of the same advisories.

Smuggling frogs anywhere is probably a bad idea. Things that may normally be a heavy fine or slap-on-the-wrist in the US can easily land you in a nasty jail or worse in that part of the world. I'm talking from personal experience as somebody who was raised in Mexico and has traveled in the area. Law enforcement is often the military, often underpaid, and in places like Columbia often non-existant or outside the control of the state. Sometimes locals will setup tourists by offering them "rare artifacts" or drugs to bait them and then turn them in to law enforcement for a fee. Often the law enforcement is looking for a bribe, or "mordida" which will set you free, but sometimes they aren't.

Even if you speak the language fluently, have a great/trustworthy guide, and have connections that can keep you out of bad situations, I would plan my trip very carefully. This is a country were federal judges are routinely murdered and a presidential candidate was kidnapped in broard daylight.

$0.02,

Marcos
 

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FYI, this month's National Geographic has a good article on some of the dangers of Columbia.

-Niels
 

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Last month i got to experience the bogata airport when i was travelling to ecuador, and the security in the airport is no joke. I was just an intransit traveler and my person and luggage was inspected no less than three times from getting off the plane to back on the plane...it was the tightest security i have ever seen....i also had the opportunity to talk with some frog conservationists from columbia a few weeks ago and lets just say that the easiest way for them to acquire P. bicolor and terribilis is from the US even though they are literally hopping around in their back yard....ben
 
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