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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, so I have always loved reptiles and amphibians, and a few months ago I bought myself a Red Eyed Tree frog to see how I do with them. After having him this long I have him in a small, live-planted 20 gallon; not ideal, but working well. Since this little guy is nocturnal I decided he truly isn't the one for me, and I'd like to upgrade to dart frogs. I've been doing all the research on the froggies and plan on starting my vivarium as soon as I can get my Leopard gecko moved out of the tank I want to use, but I'm not sure on which frogs to pick. I prefer the ones with multiple colours and a pattern, but most of those are for intermediates, and I most certainly don't want to spend a few hundred dollars getting them shipped here only to have them die. I'm not sure if a person with much experience in reptiles, fish and some in amphibians would be able to keep thumbnails, but they certainly are a neat frog. The combination of colour and size makes for an interesting creature. Most of the tinctorius and auratus sound like they are good for beginners, but it's hard to find information out there. Any suggestions? So far it seems like Azureus and a few others seem to be my only options, though I'm not sure.
 

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tincs and azureus are sort of the same. well azureus are a locale of tinctorius. without typing for the next hour and a half, i'll direct you to a great starting point.

Care Sheets - Dendroboard

there are tons of different frogs out there and im sure youll find one type that you both like and which will be good beginner frogs. there are probably 30+ natural varieties of tinctorius for instance and while theres a set palate of colors theres a TON of different patterns.

best of luck and welcome to DB
james
 

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tincs and azureus are sort of the same. well azureus are a locale of tinctorius. without typing for the next hour and a half, i'll direct you to a great starting point.

Care Sheets - Dendroboard

there are tons of different frogs out there and im sure youll find one type that you both like and which will be good beginner frogs. there are probably 30+ natural varieties of tinctorius for instance and while theres a set palate of colors theres a TON of different patterns.

best of luck and welcome to DB
james

I agree with James. Caresheets can lead you in the right direction.

Plus there are a lot of options with a frog like Tinctorius, many colors/morphs to decide from. Good luck in deciding and keep us updated.
 

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Many of the tinctorius locales have multiple colors like thumbnails, for example Citronella and Cobalts have a yellow top with black spots/ stripes and blue legs.
Bryan
 

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ask away, i have a few local peeps here to turn to, but was given tons of useful advice from the members and the site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Alright, after reading for quite a few days about the species that I have available to me. (I live in Canada, and so far I've only found one main breeder that I can order from, so my choices are limited) I talked to a few different people about starting out my first viv and they all say to make sure you know which frogs you're planning on putting in there before you start. This makes total sense because I will have to build the tank according to whether they like climbing or not. Since I'm hoping for a frog that isn't overly shy, likes to climb some and is on the larger side (it'll be far easier for me to find food for them) I decided to go with either D. Auratus Blue or El Cope variety. From what I've found online this is an excellent beginner frog, isn't too expensive, and is fairly hardy. The last thing I want to happen is for me to spend money on frogs to start out with, choose frogs that are too delicate for my experience and just have them die.

On another note I headed up to the town North of where I live and checked out a pet store up there to see what they had for equipment. I was planning on using cork bark for my background as I see it's fairly easy to get moss and other plants to grow right onto it. Unfortunately I found that the cork bark at this particular pet store was about $70 per 1 ft strip, which means for my tank I'll need about 3. Preferably I'd rather not spend that much money on just the background for the tank, it'll slow down the process of getting plants in there and I hope to grow out this tank for at least a few months before getting my froggies.

Is it normal for cork bark to be that expensive or was that just because it was at a pet store? I'm aware that often pet stores charge far more than other places for the same materials so I was just wondering if anybody else has run into this problem, or if I should just switch to using GS?
 

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thats really expensive.

zoomed cork tile - Google Search
those can be shipped, and are very easy to attach to the back of your tank. since they are flat, theres less chance of leaving gaps which frogs can wedge themselves behind, and it can be cut to size with a saw.

james
 

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$70.00 for a cork background is highway robbery. You'll find the better prices online and sometimes you can find cheap alternatives at gardening and craft stores. One question though, have you done any research on culturing food for your future frogs? You'll definitely want to look into that as soon as possible.
 

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having a steady food source is most important, especially since reproduction rates vary due to temps.
 

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Welcome Xarra. Take your time and keep researching until it comes together for you.

70.00 a sheet is insane. I would look at great stuff or a clay background as a cost-effective solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was pretty sure that it was highly over priced but I wanted to ask just in case. I'm aware cork is not cheap but it also isn't super expensive normally either. I'll look into ordering online but I'm thinking I might still just want to go with GS so I can throw a few pots in there to plant broms in.

As far as culturing food, that won't be a problem. I have fruit flies breeding in beer bottles at my place without even trying, I'm sure I will be able to get the wingless ones to culture no problem. The frogs I am looking at are the larger variety though so they won't be just eating fruit flies, they will be eating a mixture of fruit flies and pin head crickets, as well as some spring tails that I'll grab when I plant the tank.

Right now my main priority is to decide what I'm using for the background and to get this gecko out of the tank so I can start putting it together. I'm getting my boyfriend to make me a stand for it too, but once again that won't start until the gecko has found a new home.. Which I'm working on, I have a few people who want to adopt him but I am one of those people who -makes sure- that my animals are being rehomed to suitable homes.
 
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