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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I am a new owner of two d. aurautus, and just had a few questions.

The first one is I seen someone said that the uvb will get thru plexiglass and little if any will get thru glass. Is this true?

The second one has to do with crickets. Would I be able to go buy 12 or so adult crickets put them in a critter keeper overnite, and then the next morning put 2-3 adult female crickets in the frog enclosure to lay eggs. That way when they hatch its open season for the frogs.

i would have posted in the begginer section but ive read where some only look in the advanced section.

thanks
 

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Welcome to the board!

I don't know about the plexiglass, but I know that glass (depending on how thick it is) will filter out a lot of ultraviolet light, but some will still get through.

As far as crickets go, I have let crickets lay eggs in my terrarium before, but never with the frogs in them. I've always done it before the frogs are put in. I suppose you could put a few female crickets in an open area covered with a tupperware or something this way they can lay eggs but will be trapped under a tupperware and won't be able to bother the frogs. Remove them promptly.

BTW. A tip for posting: Don't mention the word "hybrid" - It will end badly. Do a search on the word and you will see why.
 

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Crickets

Adult crickets do tend to stress some frogs. Also, you may run into problems with the cricket eggs hatching in humid/wet conditions.

Crickets are actually really easy to culture. I have a tuppaware container that I use. throw a couple petri dishes full of loose dirt in the container and mist slightly. After I couple days, I saran wrap the dishes and poke a few holes in there. Once the eggs start hatching, I put the petri dish in the aquarium. After a week, I start fishing out the crickets that get too big. I only use maybe 2:2 ratio. Keep in mind, the females have the ovipositors (the long stick portruding from their abdomen) and the males are the ones that call and have full wings.

I hope this helps
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Alright i think ill try the tupperware dish upside down withe the two female crickets in it. Thanks for welcoming me. I also couldve have mentioned Ive had experience in herps for about 5 years, mainly turtles, but also water dragons, bearded dragons , green tree frogs, whites tree frogs,salamanders,and newts. I currently have 3 leopard geckos, a mississippi map turtle, and now 2 d. auratus. Sorry about the babbling.

Thanks for your feedback you guys
 

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I wouldn't bother putting the adult crix in the tank at all, and the way most tanks are set up I don't think the eggs would do well. Have the females lay in a small gladware container to incubate in, and when they start hatching, just put the container in the tank. I'm not all that sure you'd be giving the girls much time to lay eggs if it was "just for an hour or two" since they might not be ready to lay, comfortable to lay, and egg laying takes a while! Let the egg laying container stay in the crix tank for 2-3 days, then incubate it for your best chance at getting eggs.

House crix (that you get in stores) can do a number on the plants in your tank and in some really hungry cases, a number on the frogs as well, just better to keep them out of the frog tank all together.
 

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Welcome to Dendroboard! I have to go with the petri dishes full of soil / tupperware full of adult crickets method. I've tried it myself and it works pretty well. If you're patient, I'd even recommend getting a bunch of not-quite adult crickets (4-5 weeks) and caring for them until they mature, since the 6 week crickets available at some pet shops might be a bit past their prime as far as breeding is concerned. Good luck!
 
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