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Discussion Starter #1
Is there such an animal? I have a retro kit from my fish tank that I'm using. I'd like to replace the bulbs with 6500k's if possible. 10,000K's will work but I'd like the best growth I can get.
Anyone know where to get them if someone makes them?

TIA
 

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wouldn't 10000 K provide better growth? 6500k is a full spectrum I know, but plants utilize the blue and red light wavelengths over the rest. I mean, they do need the other ones (besides for yellow and green), but I would think that a 10000 K would give them more of what they need. I may be wrong, maybe someone that really knows lights will chime in. I know there are the white vho lights, those I think would be good as well. I just hope they aren't so bright they blind your frogs 8)
 

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Red and blue are at opposite ends of the spectrum. Plants use red and yellow if I'm not mistaken.

Yes, there are 6500K VHO's, they are made by Coralife. Also called the Trichromatic bulb.
 

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No. Plants use only red-orange and blue- indigo parts of the spectrum.

Don't worry about 6500 K. If you can get something in the 5000 K, that's just fine. Plants will do fine between 4000-5500.

10,000 K doesn't have much effect on plants. Its only important in deeper tanks for coral.

6500 K is more for aesthetics, but I like the warmer bulbs for vivariums.

However, 2700 K, a standard screw in compact fluorescent doesn't have enough blue for good plant growth, but has more red. Red promotes flowering.

The only time you'll notice a difference in growth is if you use very high wattage. There are other factors like PAR rating, etc. However, it shouldn't matter too much if you're going with lower intensity lighting like VHO.
 

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Actually chlorophyll reacts to almost all visible light except green. The Kelvin rating of the lamp is really just aesthetic. Full noonday sun at the equator is about 5500K and full sun under a forest canopy in the same area is closer to 6500K. Personally I think 4000K is a bit on the yellow for my taste but plants will grow fine under any of these. They'll do fine under 10,000K too but it will look puky in a viv. I think the effects of color temp on plant growth is a myth that won't go away. It's much more important in aquaria but vivaria are not aquaria.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Found the trichromatic bulbs online and they were what I was looking for.
I had searched, briefly for lower kelvin rated VHO bulbs and came up with nothing. However After doing a better search I have only found two bulbs online that seem like they will be just right. One is a GE lamp that is 4100K and the other is here which is a 5500k bulb but is $45 ea.
I don't know if there is a better option than these two.... The Ge I can only find in cases of 24 which obviously won't work, plus the sockets are power groove, I have the medium bi=pin.
Any ideas on what will work?especially for a decent price? If I have to break down and go for the $45 bulbs I will, but I'd prefer not.
 

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Actually, color temp is very important in plants. Green and yellow are reflected by the leaves, therefore, are of no benefit to the plants. Blues and reds are the most important colors of the light spectrum that plants utilize for photosyhthesis. The more efficient the plant can produce food via its chloroplast, the faster it can grow, and teh better it will look. It most definitely is NOT a myth. I haven't quite gotten to this point in my plant biology class yet, but when I do I will know a little more. Here is a website you can check out that talks a little bit a bout it. http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,600106092,00.html
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Which bulb will look better the 5500k or the 6500k?
I hate plunking down money on something like this when I just don't know which is best. There is no place for me to see lights like this in this adaptation in my area.
TIA, again :)
 

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Schism said:
Which bulb will look better the 5500k or the 6500k?
I hate plunking down money on something like this when I just don't know which is best. There is no place for me to see lights like this in this adaptation in my area.
TIA, again :)
It's really a matter of personal choice. The 6500K will be slightly more blue than the 5500K but it's a little subtle.
 
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I built a light hood for a 36 watt compact flourescent kit from ah supply about a year ago. I had a 5500k bulb in it and decided to try out a 6700k after the bulb went bad. It makes the plants look nice but the frogs in it(bicolors) have a greenish tinge to them so I am going to order another 5500k and keep the 6700k for a spare.
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks guys.
I'm thinking I might go cheap with the 6500k's. its just not enough difference that I can see to make the price almost double. ...

Thanks again....
 

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Mantellaprince20 said:
Actually, color temp is very important in plants. Green and yellow are reflected by the leaves, therefore, are of no benefit to the plants. Blues and reds are the most important colors of the light spectrum that plants utilize for photosyhthesis. The more efficient the plant can produce food via its chloroplast, the faster it can grow, and teh better it will look. It most definitely is NOT a myth. I haven't quite gotten to this point in my plant biology class yet, but when I do I will know a little more. Here is a website you can check out that talks a little bit a bout it. http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,600106092,00.html
I thing you're reading too much into it. Believe me, I'm very familiar with the absorption curve of chloropyll. But when we are talking about the difference between 10,000K and 5,000K lights, you aren't going to see any difference in growth in the plants. The intensity of the output is going to have a greater influence. The importance of light towards the blue end in aquaria has more to do with the properties of water as a light filter than anything else. Also, don't confuse color temperature with the color of the spectrum. The color temperature is simply a comparison with the color of a piece of platinum heated to a certain temp. At 5000K platinum glows white. Lower temps glow yellow, orange, or red. And higher temps glow blue. It doesn't really tell you the spectral curve of the output although as you would expect, high color temps will lean heavy toward the blue end and lower temps will lean heavy toward the red end. In theory you could have a bad plant light with a big green spike and a red spike that yielded a color temp of 5000K but in practice I doubt this is possible. Bottom line is that within the bulbs we use in vivaria, color temp is an aesthetic choice. If you want the best for the plants, choose the one with the highest photosythetically active radiation (PAR) which means get the brightest lights. If you are really worried about the color of light being provided to the plants, the color temp is not the index to use. You need to actually get the manufacturers data on spectral output.

Also, there are limits to the rate of photosynthesis. Have you gotten to photoinhibition yet? This can be very important in warm vivaria.
 

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Schism said:
Thanks guys.
I'm thinking I might go cheap with the 6500k's. its just not enough difference that I can see to make the price almost double. ...

Thanks again....
For what it's worth, I like the 5000K - 5500K bulbs best but the UVB producing CF bulbs are 6700K so I've been switching over. Although I still like the 5500K slightly better, the difference isn't enough to make me switch back. If 6500K are a lot cheaper, it's a no brainer for me.
 

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bbrock said:
Also, there are limits to the rate of photosynthesis. Have you gotten to photoinhibition yet? This can be very important in warm vivaria.
What is that? I have a 15H that is unoccupied, and "growing in" I have a 65W-5000k compact bulb, driven by a 96W ballast over one end. The tank gets up into the upper 80's (don't worry, no frogs are going in there till I put a smaller light on...I like to ZAP my new tanks with light to jump start them so to speak.)
Anyways, the Java moss is growing real well, but the fittonia is hardly growing at all, and I have one viney plant (sorry, I forget the name) that has puple undersided leaves, which is hardly growing, but showing awesome coloration.
Does this sound like what you mentioned?
 

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Dancing frogs said:
What is that? I have a 15H that is unoccupied, and "growing in" I have a 65W-5000k compact bulb, driven by a 96W ballast over one end. The tank gets up into the upper 80's (don't worry, no frogs are going in there till I put a smaller light on...I like to ZAP my new tanks with light to jump start them so to speak.)
Anyways, the Java moss is growing real well, but the fittonia is hardly growing at all, and I have one viney plant (sorry, I forget the name) that has puple undersided leaves, which is hardly growing, but showing awesome coloration.
Does this sound like what you mentioned?
Not the same thing, but if you are seeing leaf scorching, then most likely it is from photoinhibition. Photoinhibition happens when a leaf heats up beyond the limits of chlorophyl to remain active. When that happens, photosynthesis shuts down, when photosynthesis shuts down, the visible light that would have triggered photosynthesis gets absorbed by the leaf and converted to heat which compounds the problem. Leaves heated up too much will scorch. When people seeing blanching or scorching of plants, especially close to the lights, they sometimes assume that the problem is too much light. In reality it is hard to provide too much light for plants with current lamp tecnologies and the problem is really too much heat. If the leaf temperatures could be reduced, the plants would almost certainly be able to process the levels of light hitting them just fine.
 
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65K bulbs will give you optimum growth, the higher you go in the K scale the more blue and less intense the bulbs.
 
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