Dendroboard banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok i currently keep many herps, but im just starting to get into darts. I have a 65 gallon all glass tank. Now i would like to put a stream in the tank but have no clue on how to do it. If anyone can tell me on how to do this please reply. Also all the sources i previously found said that darts cannot have/ do not need a pool of water. Now this source said that the frogs cannot swim, and they will challenge eachother and drown eachother if the water is too deep, now is this true? Now im just getting into this and if anyone could tell me some good setup ideas i would really appreciate it. Also who sells the molding epozy that many people construct their backgrounds of?

Thanks for the help, Paul P.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,846 Posts
65 would be a large Dart frog endeavor.

My website has a how-to (pictures coming soon) for creating the fog. Check it out. A great way to make backgrounds is with Great Stuff (from any hardware store). I'll be putting up a how-to on this topic soon as well. I have had a few of my frogs dump in my water feature when I was trying to catch them, but besides that I have never seen any of my frogs in the water.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also im not going to attempt to mis species but what darts would do best in a group, like a large group? Also i'd like some that are pretty a active? thanks for the help, PAul
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,846 Posts
Leucs and Auratus do very well in groups and are great frogs to learn the ropes on. They are cheap and hardy, but at the same time are beautiful creatures.

You do not paint great stuff. You spray it on and then silicon peat/bed-a-beast on to it.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can fix your problime as i had the same problem when i began the hobby. First: Cobalt tincs are really good beginners, and they stay in usually groups of 3 ( mine do ) Not that you should get only 3 but they stay in ( groups ). Secont: What you want to do with the stream is have a pump from the bottom of the tank going to the surface, then dig out a stream in the tank, put plastic down in it, but going around stream 3 or 4 inches, so no leaks, ans push the plastic through the top of the pump where the water somes out. Then, put the moss over most of the stream, then add some brown/other colour in the stream so u dont see the plastic.
If you have a false bottom sutup, you can make the stream ( dissapear )
by poking a gole to the bottom on the tank. ( for this use some mosquito netting so the frogs dont get in the bottom.
If its a normal ( gravel ) tank, you can just let the stream ( sink ) into the ground. What you can do is get a hollow puiece of wood, and have it coming out of the ground with the pump in it andthen the water comes out. If you do this moss will grow on it. And itll be really cool.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
Tincs are great frogs and good for beginners, but adult females are probably going to fight, especially if you keep them in groups. They are not going to start fighting until about 10-12 months, but it is likely. Tincs that are raised together seem to fight less than adults that are introduced, but I still see it in my tincs and always keep an empty quarantine container in case it gets too bad. A 65 gallon tank that is heavily planted enclosure will give them a lot of places to hide and get away from any aggression by others, but just keep it in mind if you want to get a group of tincs. As Josh said, auratus and leucs work out better in groups. Phyllobates are great frogs to keep in groups too.

I used to have water features in all my enclosures, but now I only have it in a couple, but I have only had one experience with a frog drowning and I believe that this was due to female to female aggression in a species that can be kept communally (P. terribilis)

PDF’s do not swim like American Bullfrogs, or leopard frogs but they manage OK in the water, as long as you give them a place to climb out.

Good luck, hope this helped
Ed
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top