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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I have recently set up my first vivarium - no frogs yet.
I planted ferns, selaginella, mosses, liverwort, baby tear drops, and one cryptanthus.
Plants have been there for one month, and they have made a slow progress.

The past two weeks have been extremley cold, and the vivarium is at a poorly insulated room.
Since the heater I have ordered has not arrived yet, the only option I had was to turn the lights on 24 hours a day, for 13 consecutive days.

The result was hyper fast plant growth, especialy with mosses.
They have done in 13 days far more than they have done the previous month.

I strongly recomend this for newly planted frogless vivariums.
 

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A couple things

Right now you cannot separate light from heat so you don't really know if the increased light has caused the growth or the heat, and it could be a combination.

Second it takes time for plants to acclimate if you put them in only a month or 2 ago I would expect slow growth to start until they acclimate and begin to take off.

Third it's also possibly your light is weak or you just don't have enough and a longer light duration was compensating for not enough light to really store up energy during the day. We would need your lights model, how many, and dimensions of the tank to hazard a guess at this.
 

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The thing about running lights 24/7 is that in the beginning you'll see awesome growth, but don't be surprised if one day they suddenly drop dead due to exhaustion. I'm an avid nepenthes grower and have experimented with this. My plants that were grown under light 24/7 lasted one year then literally all yellowed out of the blue and died. I do believe there is a paper out there that supports my claim. It was the one where nepenthes and plants need nightly rest periods to survive.

Granted 13 days is more than ok, but hopefully no one thinks this should be done permanently lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As I have said, it is recommended to use 24h lights to speed up the initial acclimatization. After plants have shown some growth, switch to normal day/night lightning cycles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A couple things

Right now you cannot separate light from heat so you don't really know if the increased light has caused the growth or the heat, and it could be a combination.

Second it takes time for plants to acclimate if you put them in only a month or 2 ago I would expect slow growth to start until they acclimate and begin to take off.

Third it's also possibly your light is weak or you just don't have enough and a longer light duration was compensating for not enough light to really store up energy during the day. We would need your lights model, how many, and dimensions of the tank to hazard a guess at this.
It was not the heat because it wasn't cold before I switched to 24h lightning - this is why I had done it in the first place.

light intensity has nothing to do with it. It may be adequate, or it may be poor, but either way 24 is more than 12. The fact that you can compensate for weak light with increased lightning duration actually supports my case.
 

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I don't understand your logic light intensity has a ton to do with plant success. If you have low light then a longer photoperiod will offset that. It is very common for plants with low or inadequate light to just sit there almost stagnant until they either very slowly grow or slowly perish. If you have a proper lighting you will not need any 24/7 photoperiod to get great growth in a normal 10-14 hour photoperiod.
 

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you can leave in inadequately weak light on for 300 hours straight and fail equally to no light. Aside from that, it does beg the question: Did the plants simply need the month to establish themselves and, what you are seeing is normal growth for established plants?

Hello

I have recently set up my first vivarium - no frogs yet.
I planted ferns, selaginella, mosses, liverwort, baby tear drops, and one cryptanthus.
Plants have been there for one month, and they have made a slow progress.

The past two weeks have been extremley cold, and the vivarium is at a poorly insulated room.
Since the heater I have ordered has not arrived yet, the only option I had was to turn the lights on 24 hours a day, for 13 consecutive days.

The result was hyper fast plant growth, especialy with mosses.
They have done in 13 days far more than they have done the previous month.

I strongly recomend this for newly planted frogless vivariums.



This assumes you compensated the loss of heat exactly with the addition of heat.

It was not the heat because it wasn't cold before I switched to 24h lightning
 

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Is it possible you will experience a (nearly) equal and opposite reaction when you again renormalize things?
 

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I don't understand your logic light intensity has a ton to do with plant success. If you have low light then a longer photoperiod will offset that. It is very common for plants with low or inadequate light to just sit there almost stagnant until they either very slowly grow or slowly perish. If you have a proper lighting you will not need any 24/7 photoperiod to get great growth in a normal 10-14 hour photoperiod.
While it's true that lower light and longer exposure can generate the same growth as what would be witnessed in adequate light/lower exposure, the OP mentions better growth with simply longer photoperiod. There is evidence supporting this (in at least some plant genera), at least in the short term. It seems as though doing this early on and only for a short portion of the plant's life span can illicit faster growth and establishment. See this link on jump-starting Sarracenia

Is it possible you will experience a (nearly) equal and opposite reaction when you again renormalize things?
Probably not. Growth will probably return to the normal rate as photoperiod normalizes.
 

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Probably not. Growth will probably return to the normal rate as photoperiod normalizes.
I was referring to an adjustment period where growth slows back to normal while the plant adjusts to the normalizing photoperiod. Although I'm not sure the answer, and must admit my example is hypothetical, it stands to reason that at some point, and with some genera, the growth spurt seen is offset by the time to re-adjust. The OP was suggesting it as a "recommended" rule. I disagree. Why rush? If a specific plant (you mention Sarracenia) may benefit, why not? If for no other reason, why?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Very often, plant growth rate is limited by an "inhibiting factor" - an element that is the most scarce, or least available, or even too abundant, relative to all the other elements, at any particular moment.

As an example:
You can water a plant all you want, but without enough Fe fertilizer, its growth will be stunt. If you provide it with enough Fe, growth rate will increase. Having said that, very often, once the Fe inhibiting factor has been removed, some other element becomes the inhibiting factor - let's say it is lacking of Mg. The initial lack of Fe was more severe than that of the Mg, and this is the reason why the inhibiting factor was Fe at first, and became Mg later on. You may supplement more Mg, and once more speed up growth, only to get to the point where growth is inhibited by ambient temperature, and then too much water, and then available nitrogen.... you get the idea.

Naturally, things can only be too good. If all parameters are at their peak, growth rate reaches its maximum.

In real life, at 99.99% of the cases you can improve something, and speed up growth.

Think of a cactus in the desert:
It is able to withstand long droughts, and compared to water Lillis and plum trees you can clearly say it thrives in arid conditions, but still, its growth is inhibited by the lack of water.

Very often, the same thing happens with shade or low-light plants, such as ferns and mosses. They are adopted to leave with little light, but still, it may very well be an inhibiting factor for them.

When you provide a lot of light, either by 24h lightning, or by very bright light, you guarantee that the inhibiting factor is not light, thus gaining a little extra growth.
 
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