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Discussion Starter #1
Well, here's the first build that I've ever done- and I'm quite pleased with the results! The background is tree fern fiber, substrate is coco fiber/orchid bark with a layer of spaghnum then a healthy layer of leaf litter. Orchids (l-r: R. brachypus, P. brighamii, E. polybulbon) from Little Frog mounted on the back, as well as a variegated climbing fig. Large hunk of driftwood features Nepethes ventricosa and a vanilla orchid up top and a Tillandsia sp. closer to ground level. Foliage plants are a philodendron sp. and Pteris cretica cv. 'Albo-lineata'- and one that I don't recall the name of.

It's been seeded with springs and I'm doing any tweaking necessary to humidity levels which are a bit high @ 92% right now with temps in the mid 70s.

Comments welcome!

 

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Discussion Starter #5
i really like the leaf litter, is it oak?
Yep. I have huge oak trees, pesticide free, on my property, so getting the leaf litter was quite simple. I've got a large bag stored in the garage to replenish as necessary, and to use in new builds.

Looks like my temp/humidity has stabilized somewhat- first glance is 75 degrees /85% humidity.

Any suggestions/comments on additions/changes most welcome.
 

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Looks great really.

comment: you'll need to mist the heck out of the tree firn to keep it moist, so be vigilant. Only issue you might have is with the ground plants, but even then the choices dont look bad at all. The tillandsia should probably go up high on the back wall.

Best,

S
 

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Discussion Starter #9
comment: you'll need to mist the heck out of the tree firn to keep it moist, so be vigilant. Only issue you might have is with the ground plants, but even then the choices dont look bad at all. The tillandsia should probably go up high on the back wall.
Thanks for the comment, Shawn. It seems to be staying moist without too much trouble, and I'm keeping an eye on the other plants for any sign of distress. Now it's just a waiting game to see how things go. I'll try and relocate that Tillandsia, too.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #11
An update:

I'm seeing new root growth on all the orchids as they begin to anchor themselves to the tree fern fiber background, and the E. polybulbon looks to be throwing off some flower spikes- yay, blooms! The Nepenthes ventricosa is sending off new growth as well, and doing well mounted epiphytically. Climbing fig is dying back a touch while it's acclimating, but I think it will do well. Added a little more leaf litter and moved the Tillandsia sp. up against the back well, between the E. polybulbon and vanilla orchid.

No major mold or fungal growth, so the springs are doing their janitorial work well!

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok I'm soliciting a few opinions- I'd like to fill the back left corner of the viv a bit, probably with a piece of driftwood to give an upper layer and perhaps attach a small brom or move the orchids to this piece. Any suggestions for small broms that work well in this kind of location? I may silicon the wood into this area against the glass, but I'm still toying with some ideas.
 

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go with the broms if you are heading in the vent direction. I'm not sure if just silicone would hold a piece of driftwood. I could be wrong, but nice looking viv all the same
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I will be adding a few broms to this viv to accomodate vents. I'll work with a more horizontal layout in the future with another tank for leucs. Naturalistic vivs are definitely something that I enjoy building!
 
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