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Hi All,
A unique list of species facing imminent extinction was released by the Zoological Society of London at the recent (September, 2012) World Conservation Congress in Jeju, South Korea. Included were a number of reptiles, amphibians and a tarantula. As a former member of several IUCN Species Survival Commissions, I was eager to learn the current thinking on the world’s most threatened creatures. I’ll summarize below…any opinions you may have concerning “passed over” species would be most appreciated (please post below).
I’ve worked with several animals given the dubious honor of “World’s Rarest”, including the Batagur Turtle and Jamaican Iguana, and was heartened to see that zoos and private individuals are still contributing mightily to their protection. However, many of listed species are poorly-studied, and draw few supporters. Unfortunately, two such creatures that I’ve cared for in the past – the Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail and the Tanzanian Spray Toad – are now extinct in the wild. Read article here Reptiles, Amphibians, Tarantulas among.
Comments and questions appreciated. As I do not place notices here each time I post a new article on That Reptile Blog, you may wish to check in periodically or subscribe; you can do so here That Reptile Blog. Please also check out my posts on Twitter Twitter.

Thanks, Frank
My Bio, with photos of animals I’ve been lucky enough to work with That Pet Place welcomes Zoologist/Herpetologist Frank Indiviglio to That Reptile Blog | That Reptile Blog That Reptile Blog
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Of course, thousands of plant species have already become extinct and thousands more are endangered with extinction, but humans being the narcissistic and anthropomorphic species we are, the "lion's" share of endangered species conservation funding goes to charasmatic megafauna.

Richard.
 
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Of course, thousands of plant species have already become extinct and thousands more are endangered with extinction, but humans being the narcissistic and anthropomorphic species we are, the "lion's" share of endangered species conservation funding goes to charasmatic megafauna.

Richard.
The lions share goes to the lions, pun intended :D! Actually I think most of it goes to the pandas.

And why weren't zoos interested in these guys??? They're beautiful!!
 

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Nice article. It's unfortunate that so many people find these animals useless, or they don't understand how many are in trouble. Always gets on my nerves going into the reptile house at Woodland park zoo and hearing the things parents say to their kids. I've seen people point at A. zeteki and say "Ew, those are gross! Who wants to see these?" as well as to our own Oregon Spotted frogs. Or when parents point at rattlesnakes and say "those are bad! Those are really bad snakes!" right to their kids. How ignorant can you be?
 

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Nice article. It's unfortunate that so many people find these animals useless, or they don't understand how many are in trouble. Always gets on my nerves going into the reptile house at Woodland park zoo and hearing the things parents say to their kids. I've seen people point at A. zeteki and say "Ew, those are gross! Who wants to see these?" as well as to our own Oregon Spotted frogs. Or when parents point at rattlesnakes and say "those are bad! Those are really bad snakes!" right to their kids. How ignorant can you be?
Thanks for the kind words..it's a difficult situation; I've seen similar reactions by teachers during my time working for zoos and schools; that is specially troubling. I try to focus on the benefits animals can convey, as this is what gets through to people who are not interested or, as here in NYC, who may grow up isolated from contact with wildlife, et. You might enjoy this article on the value of dangerous inverts.
 

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Nice article. It's unfortunate that so many people find these animals useless, or they don't understand how many are in trouble. Always gets on my nerves going into the reptile house at Woodland park zoo and hearing the things parents say to their kids. I've seen people point at A. zeteki and say "Ew, those are gross! Who wants to see these?" as well as to our own Oregon Spotted frogs. Or when parents point at rattlesnakes and say "those are bad! Those are really bad snakes!" right to their kids. How ignorant can you be?
I've noticed that it seems to be the parents who teach the kids the negative attitudes... Most kids are fascinated.
 

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Thanks for the kind words..it's a difficult situation; I've seen similar reactions by teachers during my time working for zoos and schools; that is specially troubling. I try to focus on the benefits animals can convey, as this is what gets through to people who are not interested or, as here in NYC, who may grow up isolated from contact with wildlife, et. You might enjoy this article on the value of dangerous inverts.
Yes that is a great approach. I've given several tours through our restored wetland on my campus (it is the largest successful restoration site in the US) and many people who were along for the tour were very surprised to hear all the benefits. Many were also surprised that it wasn't smelly and mosquito infested. I look forward to reading the article.

I've noticed that it seems to be the parents who teach the kids the negative attitudes... Most kids are fascinated.
Yes I agree. That is why those people bug me so much. Talk about ruining a generation...
 

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I've noticed that it seems to be the parents who teach the kids the negative attitudes... Most kids are fascinated.
Hi,

Thanks ; yes, they are! The little guy seen bagging his first DeKay's (Brown) Snake is my nephew, then aged 3 1/2. He's now 5, rears all sorts of native inverts, hatches mantids and releases them, etc...we are out in the field at least once each week, and he knows the Am Museum of nat History better than most adults. Best, Frank
 

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More populations of Neurergus kaiseri have been found in the wild. Thousands of them have been produced in captivity. I probably would not call them real rare but they do deserve protection. The CITES listing was based in part on inaccurate data.
 
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