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Old 04-07-2013, 06:14 PM
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Default leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

These are one of my favorite tree frogs.I have plenty of calling,so I know I have some males.To the best of my knowledge there has not been a whole lot if any success in breeding these guys.When I got them last year they were pretty young.Here are some pics while I work out the bugs figuring out this camera/computer compatibility.Enjoy!
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:27 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I love the pics, the last is my favorite ! Good luck with them.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:49 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Thanks,It's my favorite shot too.I'm happy with the way the camera is working for what it is,just have to work out the different nuances.
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:17 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I was looking at my groups and wanted to share some pics of my gravid females.You can see the eggs through the skin.Enjoy!
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:20 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Very nice Lou....
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Old 04-28-2013, 05:28 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Here is some info I also posted on another thread but felt it may be useful if only read here.
They need to drop their eggs or you may lose them.There is very limited info on them .They like to lay their eggs near the waters edge.Some of mine have burrowed in the dirt,so hopefully they are depositing eggs.They are different from most tree frogs in the respect that they are ovipositors.They are VERY temperature sensitive.They are a montane species so if they reach over 85 degrees it can be critical. That's as much as I have been able to find out about them.I hope some of this helps.Good luck and please share any info you discover in this thread.
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Old 04-28-2013, 09:50 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I have some of these coming next week, I'm excited! Nice frogs!
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Old 04-28-2013, 11:08 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Nice Justin,Welcome to the clubYou won't be disappointed!Pictures don't do these frogs justice.Post some pics when you get them.The males are a bit smaller than the females but seem to be more colorful.Goodluck and Enjoy them!
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Old 05-21-2013, 04:13 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Hello, I'm new here. I joined up because it there seems to be more people on here with these frogs (I have 6 of them).

I would like to share my own observations. Especially about burrowing. I have redone their enclosure a couple of times as I've learned new information about their possible breeding habits. I have noticed that after redoing the enclosure that all the frogs burrowed. Males and females both. So I think they do this when stressed.

The only other time I have observed my frogs burrowing is when they were too warm. The only care sheet I could find on them said to keep them at 85f during the day with a drop to 75f at night. So in order to get the warmer day time temp I had a heat lamp. However I only used it for two days as I noticed the frogs burrowed and would not come out. So they appear to also do this when it is too hot for them.

Even at 75f they are dark in color. My room for the past few days has been around 72f because the air conditioner has been on since the days are getting warmer. I've noticed at these cooler temps, the frogs are very active and brightly colored.

I had my frogs since last November. In January one male began to call. Last month all 3 males have begun calling every night. They sit in the water or on leaves above the water while calling. However my females are not gravid (they also sit in the water some).

My first set up had a false bottom with a little water area that had a small waterfall. It was more like a bubbling brook. Both males and females enjoyed sitting in the path of the gently flowing water. However I could not figure out a way to make a bank that the females could possibly lay eggs in. It was not big enough.

I redid the entire set up. Right now I have a cake pan in the middle towards the front buried level with the ground. I have moss built up on one side. The moss creates a bank area. However it is damp because it soaks up some of the water. I used java moss so it wouldn't die being so wet. My largest plant is a Dracaena and some of it's leaves hang over the water. They always sleep on this plant. I have other sturdy broad leafed plants but they don't seem to like them as much.

I have a very large Sterilite that I think I'm going to try and make a better bigger water/land area in. I have also thought about putting them outside at least during the night and early morning. I was able to get my toads to breed by doing this. So it's worth a shot. Maybe they will also like the sound of all the other frogs in my pond calling. I've noticed that my males seem to get louder and call more often when they can hear my toad calling and the spring peepers outside. They also get going when they hear heavy rain.

I made a recording of one of my males calling during a heavy rain earlier this year. When I play this video that I made my males will start calling in response.



Sorry for being so long winded.
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Old 05-21-2013, 11:38 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Welcome Ashley and thank you for sharing! Would you post some pics of their set up? I'm beginning to fall in love with these frogs.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:01 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Sure, this is my first and my favorite setup. I really liked the way it looked. The water area was really neat. However with the false bottom, crickets were also getting under it and polluting my water. That is another reason I decided to do away with it.

Oh and don't worry that thermostat is for my snakes, not the frogs!

I will get some pictures of what I have now. It's not as pretty and after replanting some of my original plants they died. I got new ones and two of them are dying. Sigh...

Any advice on keeping those little gnat like things out of there too? I can't remember what they are called but they are attracted to house plants. I think they are contributing to the death rate of my plants.
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:52 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

This is how it looks now. With it's poor half dead plants. The java moss is alive and growing. But I think it looks gross and will probably end up taking it out. I did have it spread out but it floats and the frogs didn't like that.

I do use a tropical UV light for the plants during the day. From what I've read the frogs do not need it. But it won't hurt them.

I am going to work on a big Sterilite to try and breed them in. No longer going to try to make this one a living/breeding setup. But right now my females are not gravid so I'm in no hurry.
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Old 09-12-2013, 02:54 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I picked up 2.1 not too long ago, and they are definitely turning into one of my favorites!
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Old 09-12-2013, 02:59 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Nice Josh,They are one of my favorite tree frogs.Good luck with them.I'll answer your pm soon.
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Old 09-12-2013, 02:19 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

BTW, here are some information about the repdroduction of Leptopelis vermiculatus in captivity:
Reproduction de Leptopelis vermiculatus – - Page Array

...I would guess, that the one of L. ulguruensis is very similar.

On the above mentoned website, there are also information about L. ulguruensis:
Leptopelis uluguruensis – - Page Array

...according to this website, they are coming from very humid montane forests with low temperatures.
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Old 09-12-2013, 03:34 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Earth Tiger. Thank you for those links. That first link was extremely helpful! I think when it comes time(when the female is gravid) I will try and throw something together.

Do you guys think a large tub, with a large amount of soil on the bottom with heavy misting would be enough from this above article? Or do you guys think that a full rain chamber may be needed and incorporate a nice substrate layer . I was thinking about a single bar going down the middle, with maybe 6 holes for a rain draining into the soil, then going into the false bottom.
Suggestions? Comments?

It was also mentioned in a different thread they are hole breeders. That the female may lay her eggs in the soil that has an open hole. I think i saw ed mention something about using PVC.


I know that a lot of people really like this species. Mine are already turning into a fast favorite. I think if we can all put our ideas together we may be able to figure something out. I did read in another thread until it got derailed by someone and was then closed (a shame because that thread had ALOT of potential).

I am also going to try and get some pictures of my beauties tonight.
Thank you all again for such excellent information!

Josh
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Old 09-13-2013, 03:47 AM
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Here are my beauties!

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Old 09-16-2013, 12:46 PM
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When i cleaned their tank last night i was able to get more pictures.
Enjoy!

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Old 01-26-2014, 05:32 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I have 1.2.0 (trio) L. Uluguruensis.
My setup;
80x40x80 (LxBxH)
2x TL lighting (UV-A)
1x UV-B 5.0 (26 watt) light bulb
2x normal light bulb and a night lamp
Fully functioning home made waterfall (took me 2 weeks to complete)
Ultrasonic fog (superfog nano) which is not powerfull enough to make the mist i had in mind (i should upgrade).
The base is thermostat controlled at 25 degrees C.
And a fan for extra ventilation (since the setup has no front vent strips) and to simulate a breeze.
Everything is timer controlled, lamps from 7 to 7. Waterfall, fog and fan 10 min every hour during daytime.

1 cm from the ceiling its 31 degrees C, and 1 cm from the floor its 20 degrees C.
Humudity is normally 80%, however i am simulating dry season so now its only 65 to 70%. In 10 weeks i hope to see amplexus from either Leptopelis or Nasuta's.

Also inside;
1.1 M. Nasuta
1.1 A. Cariolensis
1.1 P. Cepediana

I do have a question; is it possible to house 2 males L. uluguruensis in the same setup or will they fight ?




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Old 01-26-2014, 09:39 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Nice frogs!You gotta love them.I have not noticed any male aggression or any aggression for that matter.
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:04 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Wonder what the "trigger" is that makes the females become gravid...
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Old 02-18-2014, 04:41 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I have 2 uluguru's 1 male and 1 female. I had another male but he died after about a year of having him the other 2 i will have had 4 years this june.
My female is almost always gravid though, not sure what i'm doing right lol. However I can't get them to breed. They went into amplexus once for a day.
I keep mine mid 20s during the day and low 20s at night. I mist them before the lights go out.
I keep 2 in a 12x12x18 exo terra. I had my original 3 in a 18x18x18 exo terra then upgraded them to a 18x18x24 but they became shy and inactive and stopped eating. Then one of the males died, not sure why, I remember he had some sore on his back that bled and so did the other male but the other survived and I have never had any problems since. The are very active now in their 18x18x24 the male calls multiple times a night, and they both spend the night climbing the walls. They always sleep together on a mushroom ledge on the back wall it's quite sweet actually lol.
They eat medium sized crickets my female will easily eat a large cricket. I laughed when someone suggested fruit flies and pin head crickets!
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Old 02-18-2014, 07:00 AM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Do they have a place to deposit their eggs? How does it look like?
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Old 02-18-2014, 04:15 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I had them in a fully planted tank and nothing. Even gave them a lot of coco fibre substrate for a while and they would burrow in it occasionally but no eggs. Now i just have them in with a fake plant and on a reptile carpet. I have a couple of ideas on getting them to breed but i don't have the time or funds right now.
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:04 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by andaroo View Post
... I have a couple of ideas on getting them to breed but i don't have the time or funds right now.
Yesterday i started simulating the wet season, hoping to get them to breed;
- By installing a timer controlled spray system (Lucky reptiles super rain).
- Raising the waterlevel of the pond from 4 to 10 cm.
- By upgrading the superfog nano (which wasn't powerfull enough to create a mist in the 80x80x40cm paludarium) to the Superfog 2 which is powerfull enough.

If any of you have some more ideas, i would love to hear them.
Maybe i can still include some of your ideas in the breeding attempt, and let you know how they work out.

Last edited by Noordzij_1; 05-16-2014 at 09:07 PM.
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:22 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noordzij_1 View Post
Yesterday i started simulating the wet season, hoping to get them to breed;
- By installing a timer controlled spray system (Lucky reptiles super rain).
- Raising the waterlevel of the pond from 4 to 10 cm.
- By upgrading the superfog nano (which wasn't powerfull enough to create a mist in the 80x80x40cm paludarium) to the Superfog 2 which is powerfull enough.

If any of you have some more ideas, i would love to hear them.
Maybe i can still include some of your ideas in the breeding attempt, and let you know how they work out.
What burrowing substrate are you using?

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Old 05-16-2014, 09:33 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by andaroo View Post
... I laughed when someone suggested fruit flies and pin head crickets!
The fruit flies arent such a dumb idea i think.
I bought some about 4 months ago, for the lizards in my tank.
However the Leptopelis eat them just as well (the M. Nasuta's show no interest in the fruit flies at all).
I just chuck a piece of fruit in the jar every week, and they still reproduce faster then i can feed them (once a week, about 20-25 each time)
Cheapest food ever, and a nice variation in their diet !

I wonder how long it takes for the inbreeding to become visible though ...
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:41 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Dirt mixed with coconut fibre.
(left it is covered with moss, right it is covered with dry leaves)
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Old 05-17-2014, 03:13 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noordzij_1 View Post
Yesterday i started simulating the wet season, hoping to get them to breed;
- By installing a timer controlled spray system (Lucky reptiles super rain).
- Raising the waterlevel of the pond from 4 to 10 cm.
- By upgrading the superfog nano (which wasn't powerfull enough to create a mist in the 80x80x40cm paludarium) to the Superfog 2 which is powerfull enough.

If any of you have some more ideas, i would love to hear them.
Maybe i can still include some of your ideas in the breeding attempt, and let you know how they work out.
I have had them in a breeding type set up since a week or so after I posted the message about not having the time, and still nothing has happened lol. I thought I had posted on here about it but it may have been on another forum.
It has moving water, a rain system and a pile of plantation soil with caves and holes in it as I read they may lay eggs in mud caves. Also have big leaves over hanging the soil and the water. The never go near the soil and just climb the glass and plants. The male calls all the time but the female just isn't interested and she is still full of eggs. I probably need a bigger group than 1 of each. Good luck!

Last edited by andaroo; 05-17-2014 at 03:18 PM.
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Old 05-17-2014, 04:09 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Or that the soil your using isn't considered suitable as a deposition site... It isn't even real soil as its nothing but finely ground coconut husk.... As a consequence it may not have condition that the frogs consider acceptable.

Some comments

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Old 05-17-2014, 07:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed View Post
Or that the soil your using isn't considered suitable as a deposition site... It isn't even real soil as its nothing but finely ground coconut husk.... As a consequence it may not have condition that the frogs consider acceptable.

Some comments

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What would you recommend? I wouldn't think they would be so fussy lol
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Old 05-17-2014, 09:51 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

not to be a smartass, but no one has been able to figure out how to replicate the breeding of them...so it is impossible to say for sure what part of the puzzle is "the key."
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Old 05-19-2014, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Judy S View Post
not to be a smartass, but no one has been able to figure out how to replicate the breeding of them...so it is impossible to say for sure what part of the puzzle is "the key."
Lol. Who is that directed to? I agree though would be great to crack the code lol.
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Old 05-19-2014, 05:06 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

I would say that what Ed said is where to start. Try and find out what the dirt they lay eggs in is like. Frogs can be picky about where they wanna put their eggs. But, yeah, I have been looking at these frogs for many years and realize nobody has gotten them to breed yet.

-Nish

Last edited by nish07; 05-19-2014 at 05:14 PM.
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Old 05-20-2014, 05:46 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

The soil could be wrong or the depth of the soil could be wrong or both....
Probably the best way to get them to spawn is going to be to use hormones.

Some comments


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Old 05-20-2014, 06:56 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

SOIL AND TOPOGRAPHY

Major Topographic features:
Apart from a narrow coastal strip, most of Tanzania is above 200 metres. Vast plains and plateaux contrast with spectacular physical features; Kilimanjaro rises to 5 895 m.; Lake Tanganyika is the World’s second deepest lake (1 436 m.); the East African Rift Valley runs north-south leaving many narrow, deep depressions, often filled with lakes. A western branch of the rift runs along the western frontier and is marked by lakes Tanganyika and Rukwa. The eastern branch is the Great Rift Valley, from the Kenya border in the region of lakes Eyasi, Natron and Manyara to Lake Nyassa on the Mozambican border. The Central Plateau, covering over a third of the country, lies between the two branches of the Rift.
It has numerous lakes, Lake Victoria, the World’s second largest fresh water lake, is not part of the Rift Valley. There are no large rivers but three great rivers of Africa arise in Tanzania: the Nile, the Congo and the Zambesi, which flow to the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean respectively. The watersheds of these rivers do not meet and are separated by the Central Plateau. All the main rivers, Ruvuma, Rufiji, Wami and Pangani drain to the Indian Ocean. The Kagera flows to Lake Victoria. Minor rivers flow into depressions in the Rift Valley.
Major soil types
Data from PLDPT, 1984 indicate that Tanzanian soils are very varied, a simplified classification follows:
a) Volcanic soils: are of high agricultural potential and livestock production tends to be restricted to zero-grazing systems. They predominate in Arusha, Kilimanjaro and South west Highlands, Kitulo plateau. At high and medium altitudes they are notable for the production of forage for dairy production.
b) Light sandy soils: predominate in the coastal areas. Grazing is available during the rains but the soils dry out rapidly thereafter and the forage has little worth.
c) Soils of granite/gneiss origin: are poor and occur mainly in mid-west especially in Mwanza and Tabora.
d) Red soils: occupy most of central plateau. They produce good grazing in the limited rainy seasons and the quality of herbage persists into the dry seasons.
e) Ironstone soils: found in the far west, mainly in Kagera, Kigoma and Sumbawanga. They are poor and acidic but can be productive with inputs i.e. mulching and manuring.
f) The mbuga black vertisols are widespread and an important source of dry season grazing.

Last edited by punctata; 05-20-2014 at 07:05 PM.
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Old 05-20-2014, 06:56 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by andaroo View Post
What would you recommend? I wouldn't think they would be so fussy lol
Reproduction has a huge biological expense. In the wild, an animal can ill afford this expense if the conditions aren't prime. It is instinctual.
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Old 05-20-2014, 07:02 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

March - May is a wet season,
October - November is also a wet season in Tanzania
The other months are dry. I would try during this time of the year for breedig. Maybe make a bunch of Slow streams in a big tank with different soil types for each section with tall grass like plants and vines to allow them to choose. My hunch is for a sandy/clay mixture.
Judy S likes this.

Last edited by punctata; 05-20-2014 at 07:04 PM.
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Old 09-12-2014, 05:09 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

Well the good news is the female is gravid alright.
So i think the simulation as described is effective.

The bad news is that the male is gone missing, i suspect the Nasuta ate him (so they are seperated now).
And i can't find an adult male anywhere

I also acquired a nephew species; L. Flavomaculatus i think it is.
I have 0.0.3 (not yet adult) at the moment but i have reserved 2 more.
Maybe they are able to cross-breed ?
In that case the result will be interesting...
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Old 09-12-2014, 05:35 PM
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Default Re: leptopelis uluguruensis Tanazanian Tree frog pics

P.S.
I have the following possible egg deposit area's;
- 12 cm deep "running" water (circulated due to waterfall pump)
- 1 or 2 cm deep more or less stationary water with coco substrate
- A stone waterdish about 3 cm deep with lots of leafs covering
- a coconut with vermiculite inside (ment for the lizards)

I will post which she chose.
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