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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2009, 09:59 PM
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Default Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

I am in the process of building a New Tank which incorporates a bunch of new things that I have been thinking about for quite a while.

I have always thought, why can't we build a tank with a removable back panel. We drill tanks all of the time, so I thought why not use my tile saw and cut open the back. I did it and it worked great. I now have access to the plumbing in back behind the rock wall, to the water in the false bottom, and to the power head if it ever needs maintenance.

I decided to rebuild a tank that was running continually for almost 20 years and as a result it had a lot of calcium buildup.



I attempted to use soak the glass with vinegar over night. The saran wrap keeps it from evaporating.



This didn't touch it. Forgot to try lemon juice. So after talking with some automotive guys, I went with the power method using these.





The green is a washable overhead marker marked on the front of the glass to give me an idea of the area to hit. This method is slow, but it works. I then got the brilliant idea of experimenting with using my marble tile grinder and a buffing disk. I works great for shining up granite tile and so I figured. I tried it in a spot on the back wall of the tank and could see no scratches so I did it to the sides and front. I didn't check the glass using the tank lights. Stupid. With the tank lights now I have a bunch of small scratches. Oh-well. I can't afford a new tank right now, so I buffed it with the compounds again and will live with it. It is vastly better than it was, but I should have quit while I was ahead.




I used the lacquer thinner was to remove any residue that might have remained from the buffing compound.

Next I drilled the drain using plumbers putty, water and a $2.99 bit from harbor freight. I make my bulkhead from a couple of plumbing fittings and a cheap plastic valve I found at a salvage store for less than the cost of a real bulkhead. By turning the valve, I can easily adjust the height of the water, and the valve is inside of the tank. Turn the valve and the no water drains.



Next came the experiment. I have a tile wet saw, but you could borrow one, rent one (go with the 4 hour rate, it only took 10 minutes to layout and make the cuts), or buy a cheap one, $39 -$79 harbor freight. It was like cutting through butter. I would not use tape to layout the cuts. I was thinking that the tape might help keep the glass from cracking at the end of the cut, but all it did was come off and I was making my cuts blind. Use a Sharpie permanent ink pen instead.



I did have to take the water guard off to make the cuts. Just tip the tank up, align the blade with your marks, turn on the saw. To make the cut, just slowly lower the tank onto the blade.



This was the square that I cut out. Wear leather gloves and safety glasses, because it does product a few sharp pieces of glass, but most is just glass water / dust.

Here is the end result.



Sorry the picture is blurry, but you get the idea. Because the tape was coming off with all of the water, I ended up over shooting one of my cuts. The glass is surprisingly strong, even with a big hole in it. I wasn't paying attention, I got cocky with how strong it was. I had covered the tank, forgot, and leaned on it while the tank was hole side up. I heard it go tink, but even then all it did was make a hair line crack from my over cut to the top of the tank. It was real easy to fix and strengthen. I just cut up the chunk of glass that came from the hole into strips.

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Last edited by davecalk; 04-30-2009 at 10:43 PM.
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:16 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Can't wait to see the finished tank. Want to see how you do the plumbing.
Walt
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:20 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

I read this on frognet and was waiting for the pictures. Very cool. Can't wait to see more.
Dave
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:27 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines



I used two ton crystal clear epoxy to bond the strips of glass at the corners and a continuous piece along the bottom. I also installed a reinforcing piece at the place of the bulkhead. The glass after it has been cut is smooth and has no sharp edges.

This leads me to the really cool thing.

I experimented with colorizing the pourable two part expanding foam and it works great. I have thought about using great stuff, I use it in my work, construction, quite regularly. I have used the two part expanding foam in working with model railroading. Casting resin can be colored, so figured that the two part expanding foam could be colorized too.

Over the years I have seen great stuff become a common tool in tanks as well as concrete / grout in building back walls, but both are a great deal of work.


This method is so much easier than either one of those methods. It is so much easier than cutting foam and covering it with a concrete / grout mixture / having to cure it etc. No more great stuff tan, and then having to coati it with black silicone, and then applying bark dust, just to get it to look natural. It foams up like great stuff, can be shaped, cut, etc. It's color is completely through the foam and is waterproof and is completely inert after it sets. I have experimented with making a bunch of different textures, and have easily added a ton of hiding holes, planting bays, a water falls and a stream bed.

I didn't like all of the work involved with making something like this look good.



Here are a couple of samples of what I am talking about.



This was made by mixed two colors together, letting it expand and using saran wrap / painters masking film / plastic grocery bags to push and prod the foam into a rock like shape.



This rock was made by mixing three different colors together and using a model railroad rock mold. The colors are just as they came out of the model.

I have experimented with making a ton of different colors. So far I have made very dark brown muds, light browns, light tree brown, rock wall gray & pink & brownish purple, (The last two were mixed to match the quartz gravel I will use for the gravel in the bottom of the pond.) The foam can also be painted just like the concrete mixtures used. I'm planning on using the technique to make an artificial stump. The whole thing sticks directly to the glass, but unlike silicone it comes off easily. If you don't want it in a spot, a razor blade scraper wisps it right off. The foam itself is inert when cured and I used tempera paints which kids eat at school. The foam is color fast, I have had it in water, have had a fish in it, etc.

I have to go and pick up my daughter, but I'll be back to continue.
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

I'm Back.



This is the two part expanding foam. It is a 2 pound density polyurethane
foam. Tap is a local company to me, so no shipping charges.

TAP X-30 Polyurethane Foam: TAP Plastics

These guys had by far the best prices of all of the internet / mailorder places for the 1/2 gallon size.

AeroMarine Products- Pour Foam


If I were going to buy again, I probably would have purchased the 1/2 gallon size (2 - 1 quart cans). Tap's 1/2 gallon prices were about the same as the mail order guy's 1/2 gallon. The reason I would get the larger size is I have been experimenting with the generating colors and textures. I have used more foam because throughout this process, I was testing things out, figuring out what works and what doesn't and whether the process is safe for our frogs. I don't think that I am going to have enough foam to complete my tank. The quart size was $28.00, but for for only $10.00 more I could have doubled the amount of material that I had to work with. Now, I will likely have to spend $28. more to finish the project. I would have tons left over, with the 1/2 gallon, but while I have been going through the learning curve, I have been using more material.


In researching, I did a bunch of reading about the products involved. The pour in expanding foam is the same product as is used in the marine, but foams sold to the marine market are 3 to 5 times the amount. Most of the marine places were around $100 for the 1/2 gallon size.

These are some of the sites I researched when I started this process:

Urethane Foam , Expanding Marine Polyurethane Foam

Rigid and Flexible Castable Foams | Smooth-On, Inc.

Polytech Foam Products Inc.


http://www.fiberglasssupply.com/Prod...pour_foam.html



These sites had quite a bit of good information on expanding foam / rock wall casting etc.

Rigid Polyurethane Mother Molds [Archive] - Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net

Sculpture Community, Russ RuBert

Taxidermy.Net Forum - Taxidermy.Net Forum - Index

Sorry, I've got to go, kids are hungry. Will continue.
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:56 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Looks great! One of the benefits of using pourable foam over the Great Stuff is the consistancy. And you can order different densities, including very hard sculpting foams. Whats the chemical composition of the dyes? Thats the only thing I'd worry about, at least the concrete tinting powders are mineral oxide based.........
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Old 05-01-2009, 02:58 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshH View Post
Looks great! One of the benefits of using pourable foam over the Great Stuff is the consistancy. And you can order different densities, including very hard sculpting foams. Whats the chemical composition of the dyes? Thats the only thing I'd worry about, at least the concrete tinting powders are mineral oxide based.........
That is the neat thing about this procedure. You can use almost anything to tint the foam. I initially selected tempera paints because they are non-toxic. Kindergarden teachers use them because a little kid could eat all the color all day long and it wouldn't hurt him a bit.



Then I experimented with a couple of mineral oxide tints and the foam tinted just the same.

The foam is mixed on a 1 :1 basis, one part A & one part B. I tested mixing the powder in several ways and found that it didn't matter how the pigments were added. You can mix several colors together to come up with thousands of different colors. I tried mixing the colors directly into one part, and I tried mixing the colors together in a separate container before adding it to one part of the foam, neither way made a difference.



I took the following technique from the model railroading community.

Bragdon Enterprises - Geo Foam Instructions

The following shows how to build a super strong very light weight panel.

It starts with using the small packing bubble wrap, purchased at Kinkos. The bubble wrap is laid flat, bubble side up, foam is then installed and spread thin, fiberglass screen is then spread through the newly poured foam, plastic saran wrap is placed over all of this, and the foam is compressed, pushed flat. The compression, flattens the foam, making it stronger, denser and harder. After the foam sets up, the saran wrap can be pulled off. If you attempt to take it off and the foam is not letting go of the plastic, the foam needs to set up a bit more.



Added a second color to test the bonding ability of one pour to the next. Foam is supposed to cure for 15 minutes or so before attempting to pour the next color.



This shows the backside of the panel. The expanding foam compresses the bubbles which adds strength to the panel.



I am planning on using this panel hold up the floor and to shape the flow of water under the false bottom to add more bio-filtration.




This panel while being thin, light, and strong can be easily cut with a scissors. Try doing that with a concrete / foam wall.



Here I used the foam to glue the first structural elements, made of cpvc pipe, to the floor.

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Old 05-01-2009, 04:42 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

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That is the neat thing about this procedure. You can use almost anything to tint the foam. I initially selected tempera paints because they are non-toxic. Kindergarden teachers use them because a little kid could eat all the color all day long and it wouldn't hurt him a bit.



Then I experimented with a couple of mineral oxide tints and the foam tinted just the same.
I realized that I left out some information. The tints / paints / etc. have to be in a dry or powdered form. As far as I know, you can't add a liquid tint or paint to the foam, because it will screw up the foam's ability to expand correctly.

I did have trouble finding a local source for powdered tempera paint. I called all of the local craft stores / school supply stores, and everyone had the liquid ready to use tempera paints. I had to order them online. Most online sources had a 1 lb. container for $4 - $6. I was able to locate a cheap source at Kaplan Kolors Powder Tempera.

They had 1 lb. containers for $2.45. I purchased Black, Brown, White, Blue, Red, & Yellow.

I also tried tinting the foam with chalk box chalk, such as can be found at Home Depot, Lowes, Menards etc. I don't know the toxicity of the chalk, but the foam colored just as well as the tempera paints did.

More info to follow.
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Old 05-02-2009, 03:34 PM
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This section will deal with the rear opening, installing the plumbing, & then itís lots of experimenting with the expanding colored foam.



First off 1 purchased several ceramic magnets, during Harbor Freightís Dollar Days. I cut the magnets in half with my tile wet saw, and then installed them (square black spots in the four corners) with two part epoxy. The magnets will be used to hold the glass door in place.



To remove the glass door I will just slide the glass panel to the left away from the magnets. Then the glass door should then be easily tipped and removed from the tank. The glass door will need to be notched in two places, one where the foamed in power cord / air tubes for the fogger / tubes for the mister / tubes for the rain sprinkler / DC power for the computer fan / etc. all come out the back; and the other notch will be at the drain bulkhead. Iím planning on making a silicone gasket around the door by putting thin layer of Vaseline on the outer side of the tank so silicone wont stick to the tank, next by running a bead of silicone around the perimeter of glass door, and finally setting the door in place over the opening. The weight of the glass will compress the silicone some and when the silicone cures it will form a nice gasket to keep water / humidity / bugs in the tank.

In the photo, you can see the beginning of the plumbing.
  • 1. The valves I found at a local salvage store for a couple of bucks. The valve on the right controls the drip wall and the valve on the left controls the flow to the waterfall. The valves are horizontally hard installed with cpvc, but vertical legs use vinyl flex tubing. This allows for some wiggle room when installing or taking things apart.
  • 2. The 3/4 inch PVC pipe on the left goes from space above the pump to the top of the tank with a couple of 45 degree fittings. This will allow me to run the misting line, the rain line, and an electrical power line for 12-volt movable computer fan. When everything is finished I will seal the tube with foam which will keep frogs from getting in the back section, but will allow me to change or add things in the future without having to tear down the tank



The pump, which I found in a year or so ago at a small liquidation outlet, is a Regent Aqua-Tech Powerhead (manufactured by Penguin for Walmart). The pump can be installed or removed for maintenance by unscrewing a male to female hose bib fitting (exterior water faucet hose fitting), which was purchased at Home Depot.

The bulkhead is installed (3/4 ď to 1/2Ē threaded male fitting inside of tank (silicone both sides of glass) is attached to a 3/4Ē - 90 degree barb outside.) A plastic valve is installed with Teflon tape to the threaded bulkhead. The height of the water in the tank is adjusted simply by spinning the valve on its bulkhead to change itís drain height. The drain valve is removed from the bulkhead to facilitate pump removal for maintenance. The nipple of the valve was shortened (another advantage of the plastic valve, it cuts easier). This is so that the valve can easily spin past the pumps feed line to the water feature / drip wall. The black sharpie pen line on the bottom is the planned location of the separation wall that is to enclose the plumbing. From the front, the wall will be the visible back of the bottom of the tank. I tested the ability to easily remove the drain valve and pump with my big hands before committing to the wall location.



These are some of the supplies that I have used in the making of the structural elements, (waterfalls, drip walls, leaf litter trough below the drip wall, etc.) and will help me as I mix and applying of the two-part expanding foam.

Items:
  • 1. Measuring spoons, 1/4 Tsp., 1/8 Tsp (Dash), 1/16 Tsp. (Pinch), 1/32 Tsp. (smidgen) Ė yes these are actual spoon sizes were got at a kitchen store. It is not critical to have the small sizes, but it was nice to be able to reproduce the colors accurately.
  • 2. Disposable Dixie cups
  • 3. Disposable Plastic Communion Cups. Yes, I actually raided the garbage cans after communion at church and took home as many of them as I could find. Once washed out. These worked really well, and I have done most of my batches with the smaller cups.
  • 4. Various Plumbing Fittings.
  • 5. Tooth Picks
  • 6. Mixing sticks.
  • 7. Green Vis-ŗ-vis Wet Erase Fine Point Pen Ė Teachers use the for writing on overheads at school. I used this primarily to mark the level of Part A / B that were to be mixed.
  • 8. Plastic food Wrap / Saran Wrap / Plastic Grocery Bags /. Painterís Masking Film. (in front of the zip-loc snack bags) All of these were experimented in shaping rocks / keeping the foam from sticking to other things, etc.
  • 9. Latex Rubber Gloves
  • 10. Bubble wrap
  • 11. Fiberglass Screen
  • 12. Hot Melt Glue Gun (temp. bonding of parts)
  • 13. Card Board Strips (For spreading the foam around.)
  • 14. Zip-loc snack bags ( For squeezing out expanding foam like one does Great Stuff from the can.



Here is a sample of just a few of the colors and textures I have produced this foam.



Getting ready for next batch. Mixed in plastic disposable Dixie cups. Tempera added to about 1/2 oz. of part B.



Part B mixed with pigment, before adding to 1/2 oz. part A.



Tank is sitting on its side. Brown Foam is mixed and spread with cardboard spreader / foam is presently expanding. Notice experimenting with texture at edge. The white tube is for the drip wall, which will be along the top rear and top left hand side of the tank.



You can see the two different colors & expansion tests. Bottom color is a dark coffee brown, Upper color is a lighter muddy brown. CPVC pipe lengths were cut before mixing the foam and pushed into the foam while it was near the end of itís expanding. The pipes were installed in two ways, some were angled slightly downward, (wonít hold water, for frog hiding spots; others were installed with a slight upward angle, to hold some water for egg laying spots.



Foaming behind the pump.
Foam poured / spread with cardboard / plastic covered foam to prevent bonding to pump / pump now installed. Hold pump in place while foam expands around pump.



Pump removed / plastic removed. Notice how the foam has taken the shape of the pump. I did this to cradle the pump and keep it from possibly vibrating against the glass and which could act as a sounding board. While this will never be seen, also notice how the foam has taken the wrinkles from the plastic and now looks very much like a rock surface. Cool.
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Old 05-02-2009, 03:58 PM
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Next experiment.
  1. On the left, I dropped gravel onto the surface of the some foam as it was still expanding and therefore was still sticky. The stones now are tightly bonded to the foam. This, I think would make a great riverbed surface because unlike loose gravel which allows most of the water to flow under the surface, gravel that is bonded to the a foam stream bed will keep all of the water at the surface. This allows you to use a smaller pump, less electricity and less noise, and still have the visual effect of a good waterfall / stream.
  2. Coco fiber could also be bonded to the surface of the foam in the same manner, without the use of silicone, and with a more natural colored background.
  3. On the right, I am scraping off a blob of foam with ease with no residuals, unlike what you have to do to remove silicone.



Next I created a shelf using foam as a glue to attach the screen to the PVC support structure. I spot hot glued the screen to the rear wall glass first, then foam it to the glass. The I repeated the procedure to the side wall and the PVC support pipe. Notice the experimental pink color. Am trying different color combinations in hidden areas working to develop the proper formulas for my final colors.

Side note: At the attachment at the rear glass, I kept the floor about 1/4 bellow the lip of the door so that water may drain way without going over the lip. In the future I might make that gap a bit larger, 1/2 inch or so.



Now Iím laying out the rear wall where the water drains back to the pump. Remember the black sharpie line. The screen will go from the tank bottom to the floor of the shelf. This will keep any debris, and any tadpoles from getting back to the pump area.



Had to figure out how to attach the bottom wall to the shelf for gluing. Folded the screen so that it has a 1Ē inch surface contact with the glass, a 1Ē inch surface contact with the shelf and the same with the sidewall.



Started with the top connection first. Used nails to pin the wall and shelf together, held the nails to pull the wall into contact with the shelf while spot welding the two together with hot glue. Then foamed it. Repeated for the side wall and the bottom wall. Most of these foam mixed were mix using the small communion cups.



Finished bonding the bottom screen wall to the shelf. Pressed the foam down with saran wrap to keep the bottom as flat as possible so that water doesnít pool up in pockets.

Next experiment:
Before I started mixing my next batch, I wadded up a small ball of saran wrap over an opening in the glass. I then placed newly mixed foam into a zip-lock snack bag and cut one corner of the bag. The opening in the bag was about a quarter inch length. Then I let the foam expand in the bag. As it expands, I would squeeze the foam out of the bag like a slow flow Great Stuff can. This I layered up around the ball of plastic. After the foam set, I would then carefully pull the wadded up ball of plastic out of the middle of the ball of mud. I just created a perch where frogs can hide from each other, where they can get frisky, but I can casually observe them from out side of the tank. I could also use this for a nice looking plantings for some hanging vine.



I really like the texture on the interior and the exterior of this pocket. It could also be used as a tadpole depositing site.



Finished hot gluing the screen to the glass and the frame. I got thinking about the water flow issues at the end of the pump, so I modified it with a 3/4 inch threaded 90. This changes the flow to a more straight flow into the pump. I thought it might be a more efficient and quieter water flow into the pump.






Next experiment.
My goal is to incorporate a bunch of hiding places and tadpole depositing sites, Therefore I have intentionally left gaps and pockets all over.



Next I packed into the hole a plastic grocery bag. Then I used the zip-lock spray can to squirt foam over the hole.



After it sets up. I would remove the bag. Rather than just pulling the bag straight out, I found that it was a lot easier to remove the bag by twisting the it into a tighter wad while pulling the bag slowly out.
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Old 05-02-2009, 04:40 PM
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After the foam sets up. the bag is removed. Rather than just pulling the bag straight out, I found that it was a lot easier and cleaner to remove the bag by twisting the it into a tighter wad while pulling the bag slowly out.


Here is the finished hide hole / tad site. I need to spay a little more foam over the PVC pipe and screen, but with all of the bumps and depressions, I think it looks extremely natural / a great hiding hole.



Next design element.
I am planning on have a drip element installed over the rear access panel. Also with all of the humidity within the tank, even if I wanted to tightly seal everything so that all of the water from the drip walls is channeled off to the front of the tank, I will still get condensation dripping down at the door. To deal with this I created a drip edge that juts out from the glass about 1/4 to 1/2 inch.


To make the drip edge, I cut a piece of PVC pipe down the middle (used a utility knife rather than a saw, to lazy to go out to the truck to get a saw and the pipe was thin.) Next I placed it on a piece of aluminum foil on top of a cookie sheet. Everything went into the oven, which was set at about 200. Let soften for about 10 minutes or so. Note: I once ruined a cookie sheet and caught a lot of grief because I melted PVC onto the cookie sheet, by doing this without the foil (wasn't paying attention to the time). Save yourself, do it with foil. Also, use the exhaust fan; PVC vents nasty smelling fumes when it is hot. Using leather gloves, I took the PVC out and held it flat until it cooled. This was then foamed to the inside lip of glass over the door.




Grey Rock Base Color / Bark Texture Experiment.
I created a decent grey base color for my rock with this mix. I foamed above the door and played with the texture.

Before I go on, Iíll give a few brief observations about what happens to the foam as it is disturbed during the expanding process. Different textures are created when you distress the foam at different times during the expansion process. Different distressing techniques also alter the look. You will have to play with it a bit to get a feel for it.



Staged this shot afterwards because the expanding goes fast.

This was my first attempt at this technique. I mixed more foam in this batch. Donít remember if it was 1/2 oz.of A/B or 1 oz of A/B. After the foam has expanded for a bit, but before it is done expanding, I dragged a stick across the surface of the foam. This breaks up the CO2 production from the foam. CO2 is what causes the foam to expand. As you distress / drag the surface, the surface collapses a bit thereby creating the texture.



By dragging in a random but consistent pattern, I created a halfway decent bark pattern on my first try. Imagine this pattern in a light stippled brown with deep dark shadowed colors flooded into the crevices.





First Experiment at a multi-colored rock texture.

Preparation / Mixing Notes:
Mixed base grey rock color into part B and mixed the rose rock color into part B. These colored parts can sit for quite some time with no resulting problems. The time issues only start when you start mixing the A parts together with the B parts. Take all of the parts and set them together at the tank. Then, when you are all ready to go, only then do you mix the A parts into the colored B parts. You have to mix the two colors very quickly so that they can be expanding at approximately the same time. It would be best if you had several people all mixing the A & colored B parts together at the same time, but even doing it by myself, I could mix the parts together just fine and still had time to pour them onto the glass surface.

I found that I got the best color mixes when I added the different colors together during the initial non-expanding time. (That is within 45 to 60 seconds of starting to mix the A / B parts together.

I would pour the two different colors onto many different areas, sometimes pouring them over and around each other. Then I took on of the mixing sticks and swirled the colors around and into each other without over stirring (you want the individual colors to be displayed, you are not trying to blend them into a completely homogenized color. I over mixed once and was not as happy with the color and look of the rock.




Now let the foam expand for a bit. Then place the plastic film onto the surface of the expansion. Then you will squeeze, push, compress the plastic into rock type shapes. After the foam stiffens up and loses it tacky sticky grip on the film, it is time to carefully remove the film. Don't be in too much of a hurry to pull the plastic, if it has not set up enough you can pull the surface off of the foam at best, at worst, the plastic film breaks and then it becomes real hard to remove and expose your nice colored rock underneath the film. Did this a couple of times when in excitement I rushed.



When I removed the film, I was shocked and amazed at how good the rock wall looked with only two colors.

I found that the colors had mixed really well and the rock looked pretty natural. I know that making a cast using a mold can look even better, but this was super easy and this was the result of my first attempt.





It is getting late. Iím heading up to NWFF later today to see a number of you all. Haven't seen some of you for years.

More to come.

Last edited by davecalk; 05-02-2009 at 05:07 PM. Reason: correcting spelling
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Old 05-02-2009, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

I love this post. The details are incredible. It is extremely helpful, thank you for taking the time to do this.

Is there anyway you can repair some of the links to the photos (about 1/2 are working for me)?
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Old 05-03-2009, 03:35 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronsWorlddotcom View Post
I love this post. The details are incredible. It is extremely helpful, thank you for taking the time to do this.

Is there anyway you can repair some of the links to the photos (about 1/2 are working for me)?
Boy, that is weird. I downloaded all of the photos to dendroboard using Safari, and all of the photos appear just fine in Safari. When you mentioned that there was a problem, I then opened the pages with the latest version of Firefox. While I was not logged in, and therefore was recognized only as a guest, all of the photos where blocked out. When I logged in in Firefox, I seem to get what you are getting, only some of the photos show up and those that don't seem to act like a broken link.

I don't think that the problem is in the type or size of the photos. Before I posted them, I exported them and saved them as jpg and set them to the highest compression level possible. That way they won't affect folk's band width, and due to the small data size of the actual photos, shouldn't be a problem for storage on dendroboard.

I'm posting this as a test using Firefox.

Could you access the photos using a different browser?

Dave

Last edited by davecalk; 05-03-2009 at 04:26 PM. Reason: Added info.
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Old 05-03-2009, 08:38 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

In Internet Explorer:
  • Logged out:
    • none of the pictures show up in any posts
    • But you can see a list of attached pictures at the end of each post
  • Logged in:
    • you can see some of the pictures
    • you can see thumbnails of attached photos at the end of each post
    • The photos on these posts Do NOT show up:

In firefox:
  • logged out:
    • You can see pictures
    • and see a list of file attachments at the end of each post(no thumbnails)
    • The photos on these posts Do NOT show up:
  • logged in:
    • you can see some of the pictures
    • you can see thumbnails of attached photos at the end of each post
    • The photos on these posts Do NOT show up:

Interestingly those two posts (9 and 11) do not have any attached photos showing up as thumbnails or a list...

Not sure if you were linking to other photos previously attached or not... but that may be the problem???
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Old 05-04-2009, 08:31 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronsWorlddotcom View Post
In Internet Explorer:


Interestingly those two posts (9 and 11) do not have any attached photos showing up as thumbnails or a list...

Not sure if you were linking to other photos previously attached or not... but that may be the problem???
Yes, I may have tried to linked to some of the previous photos that I had posted, thinking that might it save on storage / bandwidth on DB, but all of the photos were not that way. Also some of those photos I think were some of the most informative. Don't know what I should do, The time limit is up on editing those posts. I've been doing my log / journal in MS word so that it speeds the input into DB, I'm kind of slow in thinking through how I want to present things so it keeps me from running into the time limit. Happened on one of the earlier posts. Needless to say, it wouldn't take much for me to re-post the journal / posts to a new thread. For consistency sake I don't really want to repost them out of order. If I did that, I think that it might be confusing to someone just reading through and then having to read through the same stuff again. Thoughts?

Dave

Last edited by davecalk; 05-04-2009 at 08:36 PM. Reason: Spelling Corrections
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:49 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

yes, you shall attach that file to this thread!

Bummer about not being able to edit.

Moderator could link to a new Thread from this one. . .

It really doesn't matter, as long as I get to see
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Old 05-05-2009, 12:17 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Quote:
Originally Posted by AaronsWorlddotcom View Post
yes, you shall attach that file to this thread!

Bummer about not being able to edit.

Moderator could link to a new Thread from this one. . .

It really doesn't matter, as long as I get to see
I'll see what I can do.

This is a test.
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Old 05-05-2009, 01:17 PM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

Nice build journal. I also habve troubles with some of the photos, but can see others. I am really looking forward to seeing this continue to develop.
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Old 05-05-2009, 04:09 PM
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Hi All,

Due to the troubles with the photos, I'm going to Open a new Thread and repost the information.

http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/par...tml#post359079
s0082 likes this.
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Old 08-04-2014, 01:18 AM
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Default Re: Making Colored Foam / Tank Rear Access / Making Artificial Vines

I truly enjoyed reading this and cant wait to start on my next one! off to read your next thread!
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