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Old 05-31-2006, 03:06 AM
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Default Construction Journal for Plywood Tanks, update on last post.

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The update isn't at the bottom of this post like usual.

So I'm crazy. No, seriously I am, I'm going to complete - from 4x8 sheets of plywood to initial testing before adding frogs - six plywood 25 gallon tanks in less than a month. Ok, well that's the goal, but it'll be interesting to see if that becomes a reality. I'm loosely following this tutorial on how to make plywood aquariums (Link)

Concept:


The tanks are going to be [outside dimentions (inside dimentions)] 15" (14") wide, 20" (19.5") deep, and 24" (21") high. That works out to almost 25 gallons (24.8 to be a bit more exact). The bottom is 3/4" plywood, with the back and sides being 1/2" birch veneere plywood. The top and front will be 3/16" glass from the 20H tanks these are replacing. I'm going to attempt to be a glazier, this will be interesting. These tanks will be fited with individual drains with ball valves for shut off and at least two misting heads with a shut off for each tank. These will be acessable from the front via a removeable facade. Also to be included, will be two 60mm fans per tank with adjustable fan speed for each tank. I think this will give me the control over each tank I need to ensure the frogs I place in them are very happy.

Construction Phase I:

The Shell:


I offically started yesterday, the 29th, and got all of the major pieces of plywood cut. This included the back, sides and bottom. I don't have a table saw so I used a circular saw, a piece of angle iron, some clamps, and a 4' framing square to get good cuts. The cutting took all day, and being hot, it felt like it took an eternity, but I finished around eight and was glad it was finished.


My saw setup. It's ghetto, but it works and makes straight cuts.


The fence, the line to be cut, and the clamp that made it all possible.

I hadn't thought about what blade I was using at the time, but a 24 tooth framing blade wasn't the best idea to use on veneered plywood. Ripping tyeilded ok results, not the best edge, but not bad. Cross cuts on the other hand yeilded guigantic splinters. Because it was the holiday I wasn't able to get a new blade. If you decided to take on a similar project, save yourself some problems and get a 60+ tooth blade.


After alot of time in the sun and some profain words, this is the result: 32 pieces of wood and some scrap. Notice the lovely burs on the nice expensive plywood :x

I didn't have alot of time to work on the tanks today, but I did get the first one assembled. I did a dry assembly (no glue) to get an idea of how large these would be and to see if I needed to do anything different. This warrented going to the hardware store and buying some quick change bits because I was using four different bits per hole, predrill, counter bore, counter sink, and lastly a troques bit for the stainless steel screws I bought. The dry assembly went without any interesting events, just lots of holes.


305 stainless steel (SS) desck screws. These things were expensive, but are a dream to drive. The torques head makes things so much easier compaired to a phillips.


A counter sunk screw. I'm not sure if I'm going to cover these with wood puddy or not.


Ah, the shell. This went together pretty easily, took about 45 minutes. I hope to speed that up with my new bits and such, but it probably won't happen.

I got the marine epoxy today. I picked up 1.5 gallons of "Basic No-Blush Marine Epoxy". Basically two cans cost me like 75 bucks plus shipping. I'm itching to try this stuff out. I've never really used epoxy aside from the 5 dollar tubes you can pick up so this will be interesting. I've heard that it must be used outside. The lovely 90 degree temps we've been getting lately are going to kill my pot life, but curing is going to be easy.



I think that's about it for this installment. This write up is kind of a trial at writing articles for my site so if you have any suggestions to improve the article let me know either here or via pms. I'm a good sport abour criticism so don't be afraid.

-- 5-30-06

Links:
Plywood Tank Tutorial
Screws
Epoxy Info, Epoxy Store (the site is a nightmare to navigate)
60mm Fans
Fan Controller

Labor:

Layout and cut plywood: 4 hours
Assemble first tank: .75 hours

Costs:

2 x 1/2" Birch Veneere plywood, $25 per sheet, $50 total
12 x 60mm fans, $4 per fan, $48 total
1 x 1.5 gallon epoxy, $75 per 1.5 gallon, $75 total
1 x 1lb #8, 2" SS deck screws, $17 per pound, $17 total

I think that's it as far as materials so far. My total project cost will be higher because of tools I needed to buy. I will not be including materials needed to furning the tanks, just to construct their shells for an accurate compairison to other tank options.

-- 6-02-06

Too late and not enough pictures to do a full write up, but today included these two things:

Home made table saw:


And my first venture into fiberglass, repairing a mistake:

^Click on the image and check out the detail on that macro shot.

Finially, and opportunity to give a massive update. This will cover what I did over the weekend (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) and what's planned to happen this weekend.

The first thing that had to be done was to assemble all six of the tanks. For assembly I decided to ditch the predrilling for any screws that were on the side of the tanks. For pieces that get mounted on the front or need precise placement, I kept the predrilling operations. This helped cut the time down massively, I was assembling tanks in 20 minutes which helped things alot.



Once assembled the next order of buisness was to get all of the trim pieces cut. This was cake now that my ghetto table saw had legs:



I used this to rip pieces to width and a miter saw with a make shift fence for the crosscuts. I made sure to buy a fine toothed blade this time...



The faces got fitted and the drains were drilled. I changed me drain design to just using a 3/4" to 1/2" slip reducer as the fitting that gets epoxied into the tank, then I'll use 1/2" PVC for the rest of the drain. The outer diameter (OD) of these fitting is the world's most annoying size 1.01". So I bought a 1" hole saw, cut the hole, then used my dremel with a sanding bit to reem the hole to the proper size. What a royal pain that was - dust everywhere, hot dremel, and of course LOUD! With that done, the PVC fit through the holes well... with some lovely gaps, so I used some Gurilla Glue to fille the gaps. This is so the epoxy wouldn't drain through the gaps because it's very thin.

I put the drains in front to minimize the length of PVC needed to mount the ball valve to the "control panel" under the tank.





Up next was staining the inside. I decided on using Minwax semi-transparent stain (I think that's it, I'll have to check). Anyway, the color for the inside is "Early Spring", the color for the outside is "Onyx". Staining with this stuff was super easy. I didn't have to wipe it off and it's water based so cleanup was a breee. With the inside stained, I got to my big mile stone...

EPOXY!!!

I decided doing the bottom first was the best course of action. This would allow me to find out how the epoxy flowed over large areas and handled when it was being laid on pretty thick. I mixed 3/4 of a quart at a time. There were no fumes and no heat to my suprise. I mixed it for around 3 minutes ensuring to get the epoxy from the bottom and sides into the mix and poured 1/4 of a quart into each of the tanks. This worked out to be a perfect amount to cover the bottom with about an 1/8" of epoxy. I did have a few goofs though:


^Notice the complete fillet between the bottom and side of the tank shown by the smooth transition.


^ This from not spreading the epoxy onto the sides of the tank. Notice the lack of a smooth fillet shown by the right angle joint between the two pieces of wood.


^This is from not making sure the epoxy was completely spread. The first three tanks I did look great, the last three have some of these discontinuities. That's what happens when you epoxy at two in the morning :wink:

I'll have to do another layer of epoxy because of these problems, but I could have avoided that if I had payed more attention to detail.


Isn't they purdy? This is what the rack will look like for the most part. There are still a few details that aren't finished in that picture.

So the tanks are built and the bottom is epoxied, now time to finish the trim pieces. I made a gluing fixture so I could get a 1/2" rabbit without having to think. I decided gluing would be better than getting the router out to do this - not the best idea. This is so painfully slow, but the results look better IMO. The 1/4" pieces came from Lowe's finished lumber area. They're Poplar, not my favorite wood, but they're going to be stained black so it's not a huge deal.





With the trim pieces glued together for the top, I decided to do the top facade piece next. This was a pretty important piece because it had to cover the fans but leave room for them. I screwed the front piece in place and used a scrap piece of plywood to hold the poplar piece into position while I clamped it for drying.


^In that image the tank is upside down, so you're looking at (from top to bottom) the trim piece that is mounted flat on top of the tanks, the scrap piece of wood, and the poplar piece for the rabbit. The top front trim piece got screwed over these and the poplar piece got glued to that.



Somewhere in there I stained (or actually my brother stained) the outside "Onyx", you can see the results in that last pic. I'm actually pretty fond of it.

-This coming up weekend:
-Finish the trim work and stain the outside.
-Drill holes for the fans and test mount them.
-Mount the control panel under the tank.
-Epoxy the whole inside of the tanks. Hopefully apply second coat to the sides once the first dries. Fix the blunders in the bottom's epoxy.
-Start assembling doors and hinges
-Polyurethane the outside of the tank
-Finish up odds and ends for Construction Phase I

Welp, that's the long and short of it. I burned about 16 hours of solid work on these this weekend and spent around 50 bucks on parts for the trim and the doors. I'll do a proper break down later. I've gotta go to sleep. This waking up at 5am crap is going to kill me.

-- 6-29-06
Things are moving along - slowly. I got an internship at the same place my girlfriend's dad works, so I live with him during the week and go home on the weekend. This has put a huge damper on the time line of these tanks, but they're getting done even if it is a little slower than I had hoped.

Nothing super exciting in this update, just pics of the false bottoms and the control panel. Most of this past weekend was spent finishing the outside of the tanks. Talk about a pain in the ass. Had things been done properly in the first place it wouldn't have been so bad, but I've spent as much time making the outside stain job look good as I have everything else. This is largely because the onyx stain really looks bad if it isn't applied perfectly. A traditional stain wouldn't have been bad, but this stuff is more like painting than staining. Anyway, I wish I wouldn't have chosen to stain the outside like I did or at all for that matter.

Now that I'm done bitching, off to the pictures.









Solly might recognise those :wink: Close-up pics of my Ghetto Saw. Since it's a hit I figured I'd post them here. Basically I took the table and flipped it upside down, put the saw about where I wanted it, squared it up with one edge of the table (this being where my "rip fence" was going to be (a modified 4' framing square) and mounted it in place. The for the blade is about 1" wide and 7" long. I cut it with a jig saw. And in the last pic you're seeing the zip tie that holds the trigger down to turn the saw on. My assistant unplugs the saw when it needs turned off.



The water test. I had just siphoned out a few gallons from my 75g tank and had the plumbing hooked up so I figure what the hey, lets see if it actually holds water. I went to bed, woke up, and low and behold it did. And I got to test my drain to see how it would work, not spectacular happened, so I call that a sucess.





Pics of the plumbing system and the ball valve as it will appear on the control panel. The control panel will be hidden by a removeable piece that will be held in place by some magnets. This will make it easy to do adjustments while still keeping everything hidden.





False bottoms. The false bottoms are held up by ten 3/4" PVC couplers. I hot glued them to the egg crate and then layered from there with #7 craft mesh, window screen, and two layers of weed cloth. In retrospect, I should have reversed that order so it would act as a better filter, but this will work. The six false bottoms are all the same to speed things up a bit. I'm pretty sure only one will need any kind of modification, and that will be for a water feature, but we'll see.





This is the fan controler I picked up from NewEgg (the link is at the top of this post I think...) This controler will control the fans for the three tanks on each shelf of the rack. That will leave one control open, but I'm not sure what I'm going to do with that. The hole this sets in is just enough smaller that it has to be pressed in, so that will do the bulk of the holding with only something to keep it from tilting - I haven't gotten that far yet.

So that's what they look like right now. This weekend will see the installation of the infrastructure and the beginning of the Phase II. I'm off for the next two weeks so if finances allow I'll finish these.

Someone asked, I've been flipping back and forth between 1/8" and 3/16" glass. Since nothing has to be mounted on the glass, 1/8" will be fine, but I like the feel of 3/16". In the end, price will decide.
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Old 05-31-2006, 04:23 AM
 
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Let me be the first of many to say THANK YOU. Looks like I might ditch FCA for this coming rack...

Why 32 pieces plus scrap of wood? Four pieces per tank X six tanks is 24...

-Solly
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Old 05-31-2006, 12:41 PM
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Your more than welcome. I haven't forgot about your plumbing thread. I'll bump it tonight.

I can't multiply, 4*6 is 24 not 32. I realised that after I went to bed. I'm going to go back and clean that post up anyways, there are a slew of spelling mistakes and typos.

I'll be updating this regularly with all of the particulars and plenty of picture so if there's anything in particular you'd like to see just ask and I'll take a shot of it.



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Old 05-31-2006, 04:34 PM
 
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One thing I'd like to see is a running tally of costs and labor. I'm curious if it's really worth it.

-Solly
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Old 05-31-2006, 11:05 PM
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Got ya covered Solly. It's at the bottom of the main post.



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Old 05-31-2006, 11:49 PM
 
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And one more thing and then I promise to shut up...

Why do you need glue? Couldn't you just screw it together, and the use a thick epoxy mixture with lots of filler to fill the seams, and then just paint epoxy on the rest? Just a thought...

-Solly
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Old 06-01-2006, 12:29 AM
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Basically because it was in the tutorial and I hadn't made a concrete decision to use it or not. I know from a strength stand point it was moot for our applications, but I had though about not using because the possible problems I could run into while staining the tanks. I plan on using very thick layers of epoxy to coat the inside of the tanks. That with the screws are more than adaquate for the application IMO. I'm not sure if I'm going to silicone it either, but that will depend on how flexible the epoxy is.

And you're fine, keep asking questions. You know someone else was wondering the same thing anyway.



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Old 06-03-2006, 05:21 AM
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Tiny update, see bottom of first post.



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Old 06-03-2006, 02:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by defaced
...I plan on using very thick layers of epoxy to coat the inside of the tanks. ...
Mike, I could be wrong but a lot of thin layers is way better with epoxy or fiberglass than a lot of thick layers. I think it affects the drying time to where it just doens't cure right, I know it puts off some heat when it is drying.

It looks good though, I like the homeade table saw in the middle of the living room, nothing like cluttering your living space for a few vivs.
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Old 06-03-2006, 04:43 PM
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Actually, this stuff puts off little/no heat while it's curing. I had planned on doing several thin layers until I read in the product info that it can be laid up to 1/4" thick in a single pass without any problems. I need to do a few tests today to make sure that's the case, but so far it's curing fine. I'm probably only going to coat the inside about 1/16" - 1/18" thick, and my little fiberglass repair job is about that thick and looks great. The ultimate test will be to see if I end up with water all over my floor at some later date in the furute, but I can't test that now.

I'm pretty proud of that table saw. It's so DIY it's not even funny and I've been itching to get one but haven't wanted to put down the cash so I just made one. Today it's getting legs. My front porch is going to look like a redneck wood shop.



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Old 06-06-2006, 04:42 AM
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Semi-update. I'm finishing up this quarter at school, took my only final today and have a photography project to finish up tomorrow, then I'm to drop a huge update in, but here are the highlights:

All 6 tanks are assembled, have drains, epoxied bottoms, stained inside, and the first coat on the outside (I think it's going to need two). I've got every piece of wood cut for the trim, but I've got 12 more pieces to glue up and I can only do one at a time, so it's taking a while. I figured out how I'm going to do the door, I think everyone will like my solution, it's pretty left field but will work wonderfully.

To do:
epoxy inside
polyurethane outside
finish trim pieces and assemble
Route access pannel
Look at my glass options
Assemble/mount door and magnets for holding it closed
Fans
Misting system
Plumb drains.

In total, if I had the glass, the tanks would be finished by this weekend and they would be decorated/planted by next weekend.



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Old 06-08-2006, 11:58 PM
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Bump for update.



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Old 06-09-2006, 12:30 AM
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I don't mean to seem rude, but I'm kind of curious. I'd imagine building a large tank would possibly pay off, but why bother building six 25 gallon tanks when you can buy similar sized tanks for a similar price? Just the ability to customize the tanks and not have to worry about paying for drilling glass?

In any event, they do look very nice.
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Old 06-09-2006, 12:46 AM
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-I hate working with glass tanks. They're so limiting because of what they're made of. Look at my post, do you think I'd pay to have someone drill my tanks?... Never.

-It's very difficult to make a front opening tank the size I wanted from stock aquariums.

-It's more space efficient. Ex. Anything with a 12x24 foot print (20H and 25g) will either fit two to a rack, but they go up onto the side rails (face out), or three to a rack, but at 12" wide, there's alot of extra room on the side (side out). I dislike the size of 29g tanks so that's not an option.

I have access from the top and the front of the tank making maintaince easier and...

-I'm a college student so I'm moving alot. Glass tanks and moving don't go together.

IMO, why bother with the numerous limitations of glass tanks when there's better options if one is willing to put in the effort.

After doing this because I've already made the initial purchases of things like epoxy, stain, tools... I'll be able to complete any size tank I want in a weekend from plywood. The only reason this is tanking as long as it is, is because it's six tanks.

Edit: I forgot one:

-Just because I can, it's fun, and it's not in any way traditional in this hobby.

-Good practice for writing for my website.



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Old 06-09-2006, 04:06 AM
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Mike,

Looking good, your ghetto woodshop is awesome, sure beats my miter box!

I was curious why you stained the inside of the tanks, aren't you putting epoxy inside?
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Old 06-09-2006, 05:59 PM
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good question
i wonder if the epoxy is clear?

keep it coming love the tanks sofar
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Old 06-12-2006, 01:38 AM
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Ron, I just liked the idea of having a green interior to compliment the way the tanks will be furnished.

The epoxy is crystal clear. Have you ever seen a clock like this where the finish is so rediculously thick?

That's what this epoxy looks like when it dries. I had an opportunity to epoxy the inside of three of them this weekend, I'll do another update tomorrow after work.



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Old 06-12-2006, 03:49 AM
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I see, those are gonna look very cool. Can't wait to see the finished product.
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Old 06-28-2006, 11:03 PM
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Any updates?
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Old 06-28-2006, 11:10 PM
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That's tomorrow's project: get this thread updated. The outside of the tanks are finished, this doesn't include doors though because I don't have the glass or the funds a the moment to buy it. The false bottoms are also finished. This coming up weekend I'm going ot install the fans, misting stuff, and the drains, then on Phase II - The Decoration. Having a "work residence" has really dampened the timeline for these tanks.



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Old 06-29-2006, 02:54 AM
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It looks great, Mike. I like your DIY table saw. When you finally settle down and get your woodshop outfitted, you'll really appreciate having a big cast iron saw with a good rip fence (I know I appreciate mine now that I used a circular saw for alot of the things you are doing!) . . . and you'll be workin' up a storm building the biggest plywood frog room ever!

When you go to build your next rack setup, though, I can tell you that 1/4" ply with 3/4" staves along the seams have plenty of rigidity and cut down the weight tremendously if portability is an issue. Plus, if you glue those seams, you can secure the seams/staves with an 18 gauge brad nailer instead of screws, and you have an excuse to buy a new tool.

Keep us posted, as it's looking great. I love plywood tank threads!
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Old 06-29-2006, 07:26 AM
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Hey Mike..

These tanks are looking very cool indeed. Love the DIY tool benches. Waiting anxiously and patiently to see the doors and the glass. What thickness of glass are you gonna use? will GS stick to epoxy?

Anyway, get back to work on those tanks your fans need progress.

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Old 06-29-2006, 10:25 AM
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wow, they look great.

i might have to steal your design when i expand my collection :P
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Old 06-29-2006, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve
Hey Mike..

will GS stick to epoxy?

Yes. 8)

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Old 06-30-2006, 10:47 AM
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Bump for update.



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Old 06-30-2006, 11:04 AM
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Awesome Mike.

Just a quick question, the epoxy you used, does it have any flexibility? for example if you moved from a very arid area to a very humid area and the environment caused the wood to expand, would the epoxy flex with it?

The reason i ask is the wooden hex i'm making is hopefully coming back to UK with us at the end of 2007. Its creation is here in Nevada but in UK its more humid, another reason why i was thinking of lining mine with silicone as i know that will flex ok with change.

Just a thought.

Brilliant work Mike, keep at it.

Regards

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Old 06-30-2006, 03:09 PM
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That's a really good question, I don't know if it would or not. One thing to consider is that how the wood is finished will have an effect on that too. say for example you encased the exterior of the tank in something like epoxy or another plastic, then you've isolated it from humidity related size changes vs say leaving it unfinished or finishing in a traditional manner that would leave the mating surfaces of joints uncovered by the finish.

The other considerable factor is exactly what epoxy would be used on the inside of the tank. Since there are so many different formulations, there are bound to be some that are optomized for flexibility. The one I'm working with doesn't seem to be one of those, but I could easily be wrong, I'd have to do some experiements. If you're interested, I can cover some samples and post what I find - I'll be nice for me to know any way.

My thought is that because you're working with plywood, there is going to be alot of expansion in different directions. Now the plywood may be act like a buffer where the inside doesn't expand at all and the outside does, or it could distort uniformaly throughout its cross section - I don't know. But if you were to have problems, it would be at the joints of the tank, so simply siliconing those would prevent that from being an issue.

----

I'm honestly not sure if GS will adhear to this epoxy or not. From my encounters with GS, I imagine that as long as the GS contacts the epoxy while its still tacky, it'll stick. If not, then I've got some tricks up my sleve to adhear the two - polyurethane adheasive, epoxy, TNT... You know, the usual :P



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Old 07-11-2006, 02:53 PM
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Mike & Steve,
ive never worked with any flexible epoxy. all of the stuff ive ever worked with hardens up pretty rigid. with the first tanks i built i had trouble because of this. after loading it up with dirt plants and water i tried to move it. the movement and weight were enough to crack a portion of the eopoxy (in a corner) and cause the dang box to leak. to keep this from happeneing now i use silicon in between the pieces of wood as i attach them together. i aslo use excessive amounts of epoxy in the corners.

as far as flexing over time, i dont believe the epoxy is going to allow the wood to flex in. IMO, (ive never moved with one of these tanks put together) if there is any swelling it should be minimal, and i believe the eopxy would be strong anough to force the swelling to go in an outward direction.
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Old 07-13-2006, 08:12 AM
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It's 4am; five of the six tanks are planted (the 6th has a water feature and will take some more time). I'm missing one piece from each aspect of the infrastructure to finish them, so they're 99% done. Update in the early afternoon: ice cream, then sleep.



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Old 07-14-2006, 10:30 PM
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I'm a little on the lazy side this week, hence the ever delayed update. In my laziness I did get the images resized and online. No comments about the pictures are online yet, that's for a later date - but before I get the glass on and that updated.

Warning - 40 images and a little more than 10megs. Sorry for the size, I didn't think about that when I resized them.
Link

I tried to get them in cronologial order and pictures of each tank in each stage of foaming/dirting/planting.



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Old 07-16-2006, 06:04 PM
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do you have a final pic of them all set up. ie: all the tanks in one pic?
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Old 07-16-2006, 10:05 PM
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No because they're not all done. I still have to do doors for them and work on the 6th tank with the water feature. That one is still just GS waiting for a final scuplting and then dirt.



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Old 07-27-2006, 02:42 AM
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Ahem... any updates for us?
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Old 07-27-2006, 10:34 AM
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This weekend/early next week. I had planned to pickup the glass last weekend, but when I showed up at the shop they were closed. I'll also resize those images from the last "update", add text, and put them on here like I did for the first part of the journal.



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Old 03-25-2007, 02:54 AM
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Any updates?
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Old 03-25-2007, 03:50 AM
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Ya know, I've been wondering the same thing? Lets see those thigs. :wink:
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Old 03-26-2007, 01:22 AM
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Alrighty, looks like I'll update

These have been up and running since right after that last post when I got the glass - around the beginning of August. There have only been a few things that have caused problems.

First (as you can see in some of the pics below) are the holders for the misting nozzles. Hot glue doesn't hold to epoxy or polypropylene very well. So these holders have been coming off. I've since started using stainless wood screws to hold them in place.

Second, the glass was slightly too big for the openings of all but a few tanks, so the fronts of them had to be removed, moved down 1/4", and put back on. This broke the seal of the epoxy around the inside of the tanks. Only one has leaked any interesting amount, and that's just started, but a few fronts are in need of being replaced because of water absorption. Which leads me to problem #3

The area of wood that the hinges are secured to wasn't sealed when I made the tanks. I didn't think I'd need to do it. So as the tanks are sprayed, the water runs off of the glass and onto this unsealed plywood. Guess what happens, the screws that hold the doors start pulling out of the water soaked plywood. So I am replacing the fronts with solid wood (red oak), sealing them properly, and using silicone to seal the epoxy-epozy interface between the tank and the front. This will allow me to simply rip the front off if I need to, clean some silicone and reapply, and put them back on. This will give me access to the false bottoms if I need it.

As you'll see, I'm missing a tank. Yes, almost a year later, I have one tank that isn't done. It's about 80% done in terms of hardscape and structure, but it'll need to be planted and proofed before I put frogs in it. It's the tank I'm trying hydraulic cement in. The dry run I did with it which lasted at least a month, probably more, was great. I just had to make some, eh, adjustments we'll say.

The Leucs' and Galacts' tanks were recently refurbished per se. I removed all of the old dirt (which was hardwood mulch) that had become a nasty mess, and replaced it. I also replanted those two tanks, so they haven't had an opportunity to grow in like the other tanks.

So for the pics:
Here's the rack:


From left to right on the rack, top to bottom:
Leucs:


Galacts:


Female Uyama Pumilio:


Pair of Uyama Pumilio:


Dwarf Cobalts:


Screw being pulled out of front piece of plywood:




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Old 03-26-2007, 01:35 AM
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Very nice Mike! What do you think was the problem with the hard wood mulch? What did you replace it with?
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Old 03-26-2007, 11:01 PM
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Nice , I really like your leuc & Galact tanks . Your driftwood in the foreground , does that go all the way into the background . I like how it uses the whole space from front to back .
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Old 03-26-2007, 11:01 PM
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Nice , I really like your leuc & Galact tanks . Your driftwood in the foreground , does that go all the way into the background . I like how it uses the whole space from front to back .
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