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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-16-2019, 06:48 PM
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Default Pumilio Groups

Has anyone successfully house 5-7 pumilio in a group before? If so, what size tank/condition/issues etc did you experience?
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Old 07-16-2019, 07:36 PM
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Default Re: Pumilio Groups

Yes.

I personaly keep 5 Red frog beach bastimentos and their juvenilles in a 100x50x50 (cm) tank since 2012. Escudo, salt creek, blue jeans and puerto viejo also should not be a problem in group according to other hobbyist. I cannot confirm other morphs from experience or knowledge. I do highly recomend keeping pumilio in couples if you want the best results for getting the most offspring.

I know from other hobbyists colon gave problems if kept in group.

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Old 07-16-2019, 08:09 PM
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Default Re: Pumilio Groups

Tijl, how much experience with frogs did you have before you did this? You strike me as a very dedicated, very experienced hobbyist, and I assume this wasn't your first rodeo.

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Originally Posted by Tijl View Post
Yes.

I personaly keep 5 Red frog beach bastimentos and their juvenilles in a 100x50x50 (cm) tank since 2012. Escudo, salt creek, blue jeans and puerto viejo also should not be a problem in group according to other hobbyist. I cannot confirm other morphs from experience or knowledge. I do highly recomend keeping pumilio in couples if you want the best results for getting the most offspring.

I know from other hobbyists colon gave problems if kept in group.

Greets,
Tijl
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Old 07-16-2019, 08:54 PM
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Actualy, this was my first rodeo. 😄 I kept only tinctorius boulanger before i bought my pumilio. At this point i was a litlle more than a year in the hobby i believe. I found than that opinions varied on keeping pumilio in group or in couples. But i admit i learned along the way, the best advice to give is keeping most frogs in couples... But some can be kept in groups with no problems.

Thank you for the compliment! I think i also consider myself a dedicated frog enthousiast, but i still learn from other People and experience new stuff every day since i started the hobby. I think that is why i love the community and the frogs so mutch! I also feel like this forum and its members is an amazing addition to my experience of this hobby.

I am sure this goes for most of you here.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:23 PM
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Default Re: Pumilio Groups

Sweet thank you Tijl, did you get tads at all while they were grouped? I have a 120x100x50 cm tank that I am using for the pums.
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:47 AM
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My rfb are still grouped, last week i got 3 joung frogs leaving their bromeliad.
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Old 07-28-2019, 12:32 PM
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When I was in Costa Rica there were huge groups of Blue Jeans. They hoped around right by the trail and did not seem afraid of people at all. There had to have been a couple hundred. Conditions in an enclosure are different. I would love to add some to my collection some day.
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Old 07-28-2019, 03:07 PM
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Do you have pictures of these costarican blue jeans?
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Old 07-31-2019, 10:51 AM
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I wish I still did! We spent 10 days in Costa Rica and it was 16 years ago. It was so humid all our electronic devices were in rough shape. Not many pictures turned out. My socks never dried out either. The frogs were a beautiful cherry red with bright blue legs. Some individuals had more blue then others. I have noticed that when I see picture of blue jeans in captivity their colors seem a bit washed out. Has anyone else noticed this? Is it because of the diet change or because I saw them in real sun light?
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Old 07-31-2019, 01:48 PM
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Default Re: Pumilio Groups

The color difference has to do with multiple facors :

Food (what the feederbugs eat)
exposure to UV
morph (There are not allot of costarican pumilio in the hobby)
....

Johan De Gruyter has send me some interesting information on this "color" topic.

This document link (study on cartenoids with calydrias) :

https://cdn.fbsbx.com/v/t59.2708-21/...Xz6Wn2mRc8d3AU


and this study :

"Amphibians have recently experienced unprecedented declines in the wild, the causes of which are often difficult to mitigate. This has increased the importance of ex situ conservation; however, long-term maintenance and breeding of amphibians in captivity often has limited success. In vertebrates, vitamin D is required for calcium homeostasis and is produced endogenously in skin exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light; however, UV light can be harmful to amphibians in some instances. Carotenoids are dietary pigments that may provide protection from UV light. The aim of this study was to assess the protective capability of carotenoids against the potentially harmful effects of UV light in Silurana (=Xenopus) tropicalis larvae raised in an enhanced or limited UV environment. Tadpole survival and the size and developmental stage reached by the end of the study period were measured. Carotenoids had a significantly positive effect on developmental rate in both UV-limited and UV-enhanced environments. Larvae in an enhanced UV environment were significantly larger than those raised under a limited UV environment, irrespective of diet. Carotenoid-fed larvae tended to have increased survival in relation to those raised without carotenoids, but only in a limited UV environment. Carotenoids appear to provide little protection against UV light in this case. The role of carotenoids in amphibian health has not previously been studied. We show that carotenoid availability significantly influences development and may increase survival in S. (X.) tropicalis larvae. This finding may have important implications for recommendations made on the nutrition of amphibians in captivity."


(part 2 : Influnce of UVB on Oophaga pumilio study)

"Ambient ultraviolet-B radiation can harm amphibian eggs, larvae and adults. However, some amphibians avoid UV-B radiation when given the opportunity. The strawberry poison dart frog, Oophaga pumilio, is diurnal and males vocalize throughout the day in light gaps under forest canopies that expose them to solar radiation. Previous studies have demonstrated that males calling from high perches are more successful at mating than those at lower perches. We investigated whether frogs at higher perches receive more ultraviolet-B than those calling from lower perches. We also investigated whether frogs on perches receiving relatively low ultraviolet-B levels maintained their positions for longer compared to individuals calling from perches receiving higher levels of ultraviolet-B. Finally, since it has been hypothesized that some animals utilize levels of UV-A as a visual cue to avoid UV-B damage, we artificially elevated ultraviolet-A levels to examine whether males exposed to artificially elevated ultraviolet-A abandoned their perches sooner compared to males exposed to visible light. We found that frogs called from perches receiving low ultraviolet-B regardless of perch height, and that frogs maintain their positions longer on perches receiving low ultraviolet-B compared to perches receiving even slightly higher ultraviolet-B levels. Exposing the frogs to artificially elevated levels of ultraviolet-A radiation caused males to move off of their perches faster than when they were exposed to a control light source. These experiments suggest that ultraviolet radiation plays an important role in frog behavior related to perch selection, even in rainforests where much of the solar radiation is shielded by the forest canopy."


"Many animals, plants, and microorganisms are harmed by ultraviolet-B radiation. In particular, several members of class amphibia are negatively affected by exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation. Exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation can cause death or various types of sublethal damage in amphibians. One mechanism to lessen the effect of harmful ultraviolet-B radiation is to limit exposure to sunlight behaviorally. Few studies have examined the behavioral sensitivity of adult amphibians to ultraviolet-B radiation. Using both field experiments and field observations, we found that two species of diurnal poison-dart frogs in Costa Rica (Dendrobates pumilio, D. auratus) consistently preferred areas in the field and within experimental testing chambers that offered low levels of ultraviolet-B radiation. In field observations, vocalizing D. pumilio were found at locations with significantly lower levels of ambient ultraviolet-B compared to random locations throughout their natural habitat. Ultraviolet-B avoidance behavior may be an important behavioral response for tropical frogs in light of recent evidence suggesting a significant increase in the levels of ambient ultraviolet-B radiation in the tropics over the past decade."
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Old 08-01-2019, 03:28 AM
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Extremely fascinating so possibly carotenoids are lacking in some captive frogs. I wonder if enhancing fruit fly culture media with carrot/squash baby food and paprika would improve colors? Maybe feeding fruit fly larvae gut loaded with carotenoids would benefit them also. I would love some Costa Rican blue jeans. Does anyone know anyone with any? They were so bold and their colors just popped against the green foliage. The males stood up on their tiptoes as they called. It was so incredible to see so many together in one place. I wish you all could have seen them. The thing that I noticed was they were the only dart frogs we saw the whole time we were there. They were so concentrated in just a few feet of trail it was a rather thick section of jungle. Possibly just the correct type of lighting for calling without damaging their skin. Forest canopy destruction might be a big factor in decreasing dart frog numbers. If they are that sensitive to the type of lighting maybe loss of proper shading reduces calling and breeding.
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