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Old 01-13-2005, 11:34 PM
 
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Default Terribilis, prolific breeders?

I've heard a lot of breeding stories from G+Bs, tincs, leucs, vents, pums, etc. but no one really mentions terribilis when it comes to breeding. So, I was wondering where would they rank as far as breeding compared to other darts? Just curious. Details welcome.

Thanks,

Mike
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Old 01-13-2005, 11:37 PM
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I remember when they were $250 p/frog and now you can find them for $40 (captive breed). That is a good indication that these guys will produce in captivity
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Old 01-13-2005, 11:51 PM
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Mike,
Talk to Scott at the next MADD meeting he has MILLIONS of the suckers from one breeding tank.

You can still google search and find old ads from 7 years ago and $250 terriblis... and $40 retics... go figure.
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Old 01-14-2005, 12:15 AM
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Like Richard said Scott Menigoz has some of the most prolific 'green' terribilis out there? I saw them and they are one of the boldest, if not 'the' boldest frog out there...totally fearless. I think Scott wants to eventually have a meeting at his place, which would afford us the opportunity to see his ever-expanding collection. By the time we get there, he might have tripled his collection.

I assume the orange morph is harder to breed because they are more expensive and not so readily available. Sean Stewart has the orange ones and had them at our last meeting. Natalia (nana_enes) really, really wants them!
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Old 01-14-2005, 12:17 AM
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More eggs than tincs or leucs and less eggs than tricolors......about 10 - 15 per clutch.
Ed
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Old 01-14-2005, 01:15 AM
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The tads of the orange and yellow are more fragile, plus they just really hit US soil around 2001, so pretty new in the hobby.
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Old 01-14-2005, 01:44 AM
 
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Hi,

I have experienced very large clutch sizes from my orange terribilis (20+ eggs) but out of these only around half make it to tadpole stage. The eggs seem fairly touchy to me, and the tads are pretty touchy during the first few days. But, after they get past that they are pretty hard to kill, the tads do really well in groups and morph out huge. However, they morph fast and seem a little prone to drowning if not given an opportunity to climb out of the water.

Alexander
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Old 01-14-2005, 02:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexanderStubbs
Hi,

I have experienced very large clutch sizes from my orange terribilis (20+ eggs) but out of these only around half make it to tadpole stage. The eggs seem fairly touchy to me, and the tads are pretty touchy during the first few days. But, after they get past that they are pretty hard to kill, the tads do really well in groups and morph out huge. However, they morph fast and seem a little prone to drowning if not given an opportunity to climb out of the water.

Alexander
With vittatus and bicolor I've found that the touchiness of the newly hatched tads can be dealt with by not messing with the tads after they hatch for a few days. I leave them in the petri dish and just mist heavily so there is about a mm of water in the dish. When the tads are vigorously squirming, I add enough water SLOWLY that they can start to swim around. I feed sparingly with Sera Micron for a few more days and then finally move them to large communal tubs for rearing. The problems I was having with the new tads came from moving them to too deep of water too fast. After watching tads get reared by the parents, I realized they are left wriggling on a wet leaf for several days before Dad transports them so I took a lesson.
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Old 01-14-2005, 02:13 AM
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I have 9 Mints in a 48"x24"x16"high viv , and they do great in groups, are huge eaters and more bold then a pitbull !! Mine are juvs to semi-adult ,ive read they are sexually mature around 18 months or if they have grown to a mature size,, is this correct ? and any tips on breeding from anyone :lol:
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Old 01-14-2005, 04:51 AM
 
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Thanks for all the info so far. But like Zoso asked, more breeding info?

Thanks

Mike
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Old 01-14-2005, 02:35 PM
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My pair of mint terribilis have probably produced around 100 froglets in under a year. Like Alexander, I have also seen 20+ egg clutches, but they generally do bad. I often get 16 egg cultures without a single bad egg. I have yet to have a SLS case with terribilis. Unlike Alexander, I have found my mint terribilis to be my most sturdy eggs. Them and my vittatus lay flawless clutches.

On breeding, I keep my pair in a standard ten gallon. Peat moss for substrate and pathos and other various plants. No running water or anything special. It took a while for them to start breeding, but once they did they never quit. I spray them less than once a week and I still get eggs every two weeks. They usually lay under the coconut hut but I have personally witnessed them laying out in the open. I think the biggest thing with terribilis is patience. They take 2 years to mature. Hope this helps.
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Old 01-14-2005, 08:58 PM
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Yea! More info. I was thinking about getting this species.... I probably am since there round 40$ and bold.
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