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Old 02-13-2018, 09:47 AM
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Default 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

This is a tank I started a while ago. I recently refreshed it and got a few quick pictures. 'Estonia' is intended to represent a cool, shaded Baltic forest with Birches and Firs. This terrarium is very easy care, requiring only occasional watering, pruning and glass cleaning.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:44 AM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

Really cool. Have you conidered innoculating your birch with mushroom dowel spawn?
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:44 AM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

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Originally Posted by Louis View Post
Really cool. Have you conidered innoculating your birch with mushroom dowel spawn?
Yes I have wondered about that. I also have an idea for a dedicated fungus display started with dowel spawn. There is actually some volunteer Trametes on the lower portion of one of those poles, not visible in these photos.

Last edited by hydrophyte; 02-14-2018 at 02:51 AM.
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:47 AM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

I just went to look quick and found T. versicolor for sale as dowel spawn right here...

Trametes versicolor (Turkey Tail) Plug Spawn

I could probably go out and cut m own pieces of spawn from a rotting log easily enough, but a pure culture would be a more sure way to get it without contaminants.
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Old 02-14-2018, 03:30 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

Most of the time commercially available dowel or grain spawn has been produced from specific strains of a species selected for desirable characteristics like aggressive colonization or greater number of fruiting bodies.
T. versicolor would look awesome but if you already have some cropping up you can probably just sit back and wait without any further attempts to innoculate.
I really like the tank all round though, I love seeing planted setups recreating climates other than tropical rainforest.
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Old 02-17-2018, 02:59 AM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

I actually do research on wood rotting fungi, and I think if you get something more aggressive than the turkey tail mushroom, you will have three globs of goop in a year or so. The idea of a dedicated 'shroom display is good. With many wood rotters, when they finally fruit, they are close to finished eating their substrate. Developing fruiting bodies is costly in terms of energy and resources, so if the living is good, why spoil the party?
The turkey tail I've seen is more perennial, like most polypores. They grow outward in annual rings. Some of them, like the F. pinicola can be aged by counting their rings. T. versicolor (turkey tail) is beautiful as it grows. I'd be psyched that it was there and call it good in that viv.
Which, by the way is very cool. Good job.
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Old 02-18-2018, 01:43 PM
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That looks like birch wood, how does it hold up moisture?
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Old 02-18-2018, 03:17 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

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I actually do research on wood rotting fungi
Do you have any suggestions for species that might be well suited if you were to try something like this with dowel spawn in hawthorne wood?
And any thoughts on how harmful spores in the air would be to vivarium inhabitants? that's always been my only concern with mushrooms in tanks because of mushroom workers lung in humans.
I've seen an estimate that a cubic meter of clean country air where oyster mushrooms are present could be expected to contain 10,000 spores but that a single large cap can eject 100 million spores per hour, seems like this wouldn't be desirable in a tank with animals. Do you have any idea how this compares to something like turkey tail?
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Old 02-18-2018, 09:45 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

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Do you have any suggestions for species that might be well suited if you were to try something like this with dowel spawn in hawthorne wood?
And any thoughts on how harmful spores in the air would be to vivarium inhabitants? that's always been my only concern with mushrooms in tanks because of mushroom workers lung in humans.
I've seen an estimate that a cubic meter of clean country air where oyster mushrooms are present could be expected to contain 10,000 spores but that a single large cap can eject 100 million spores per hour, seems like this wouldn't be desirable in a tank with animals. Do you have any idea how this compares to something like turkey tail?
I also wondered about this. Spores from numerous fruiting bodies inside a structure with humans could also be problematic. Are there safety recommendations for hobby mushroom culture?
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Old 02-18-2018, 11:56 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

I would think Lentinus (Shitakes) would work, it might eat the hawthorn quickly, since it can chow down oak and ironwood. Laetiporus (Chicken of the woods) would definitely work, but it may not fruit until the wood is almost completely consumed. It is also parasitic, so if you have live hawthorns around it might not be a good idea.
Oysters, as I am fond of saying, will grow on mayonnaise, (fungi joke) so that's a definite candidate.
I have had, and do have, volunteer mushrooms in vivs. I actually have Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear) growing in a viv right now. We tried to culture it for our wood rotting study, but had zero luck when expanding it to large bags. Apparently, I got some in some ABG and it's making tiny 1/2" fruits. Wood Ear is an Ascomycete (cup fungus) and isn't as obnoxious a spore-er as the Basidiomycetes (gilled mushrooms). I have not seen any negative effects on other viv inhabitants. But if you had a 2lb florescence in a 30 gallon tank, that might be pushing it.
What we are investigating is using native wood rotters to consume wood chips left behind from forest mitigation logging projects. When we started there was a lot of talk in the lay community about using mushrooms for remediation and having a crop as a by-product. Co-cropping- save the planet, etc. We have not found that to be the case. There's growing for fruit, and there's growing for decay- it's looks like it's a choose your desired result and let that inform your methods.
You might want to keep that in mind moving forward. I actually thought you were talking about doing a mushroom vivarium- which could be cool. But if you want big mushrooms with animals- choose which is more important. Lot's of mushrooms: few animals with lots of space. Lots (or normal density) of animals: few mushrooms.
But since I've never intentionally done it, I will use the disclaimer that I'm not sure where that balance is in a closed eco-sytem (a pico-system, if you will).
Please keep us updated on how you choose to proceed, and document it. I think it'd be a very popular thread. You can now be a pioneer. Good Luck!
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Old 02-19-2018, 01:52 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

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What we are investigating is using native wood rotters to consume wood chips left behind from forest mitigation logging projects. When we started there was a lot of talk in the lay community about using mushrooms for remediation and having a crop as a by-product. Co-cropping- save the planet, etc. We have not found that to be the case.
If you have time please elaborate on this a little more, I'd love to understand your findings. When I'm on leave I volunteer with a charity that this is relevant to, and there's a lot of discussion along these lines at the moment as they've just discovered Paul Stamets.
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Old 02-19-2018, 03:11 PM
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Default Re: 'Estonia' - 37G Terrarium Recreates a Baltic Woodland

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravage View Post
I would think Lentinus (Shitakes) would work, it might eat the hawthorn quickly, since it can chow down oak and ironwood. Laetiporus (Chicken of the woods) would definitely work, but it may not fruit until the wood is almost completely consumed. It is also parasitic, so if you have live hawthorns around it might not be a good idea.
Oysters, as I am fond of saying, will grow on mayonnaise, (fungi joke) so that's a definite candidate.
I have had, and do have, volunteer mushrooms in vivs. I actually have Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear) growing in a viv right now. We tried to culture it for our wood rotting study, but had zero luck when expanding it to large bags. Apparently, I got some in some ABG and it's making tiny 1/2" fruits. Wood Ear is an Ascomycete (cup fungus) and isn't as obnoxious a spore-er as the Basidiomycetes (gilled mushrooms). I have not seen any negative effects on other viv inhabitants. But if you had a 2lb florescence in a 30 gallon tank, that might be pushing it.
What we are investigating is using native wood rotters to consume wood chips left behind from forest mitigation logging projects. When we started there was a lot of talk in the lay community about using mushrooms for remediation and having a crop as a by-product. Co-cropping- save the planet, etc. We have not found that to be the case. There's growing for fruit, and there's growing for decay- it's looks like it's a choose your desired result and let that inform your methods.
You might want to keep that in mind moving forward. I actually thought you were talking about doing a mushroom vivarium- which could be cool. But if you want big mushrooms with animals- choose which is more important. Lot's of mushrooms: few animals with lots of space. Lots (or normal density) of animals: few mushrooms.
But since I've never intentionally done it, I will use the disclaimer that I'm not sure where that balance is in a closed eco-sytem (a pico-system, if you will).
Please keep us updated on how you choose to proceed, and document it. I think it'd be a very popular thread. You can now be a pioneer. Good Luck!
They have been working on some of those same questions at the USDA Forest Products Lab affiliated with the university here. Although I haven't heard news about that in a few years.

As you mentioned previously, unless it were to work more as a temporary display, the best choices for a planted ecosystem setup featuring fungus would be the more woody perennial conks like Trametes. While I have this one going here pretty well I should try to dig some small pieces of wood out to inoculate a couple more birch poles and then try building something around it if it establishes.

If you are on Instagram, please check out my page there. Which is the main place where I have been keeping my design stuff including the terrariums, kites and fishing rods...

https://www.instagram.com/biggs.devin/

Last edited by hydrophyte; 02-19-2018 at 03:14 PM.
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