new pums? - Dendroboard
Dendroboard

Go Back   Dendroboard > Dart Frogs > Member's Frogs & Vivariums
Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read Advertise

Support Our Sponsors
No Threads to Display.

facebook

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:12 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Georgia
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default new pums?

i have recently become enamored of the new pum morphs comming in to the us recently. how long do you expect it to be before they are available to the rest of us? I especially like the darklands and the cayo de aqua. Of course I would love the most rare of the bunch.
what do any of you know about these frogs?
I still have a 55 gal or so that I want to build, and I have been thinking about what kind of frog I want to put in there whenever I build this one.
I have done some research and asked some questions and now I am exploring what my mother would call a "pipe dream" but I am sooooo super curious about these frogs.

so all me a dreamer or an addict whatever name works best...
__________________
Be Happy, Be Healthy, Be Blessed
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:17 AM
NCSUdart's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 758
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

darklands and cayo de agua are not new morphs coming into the country. the only new morphs i've seen coming in are the unnamed ones that just came in this month. darklands and cayo are older morphs that are simply rare. expect to pay upwards of 300 each, possibly more. these two morphs will probably never become common in the hobby.
__________________
LOTS OF FROGS
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:28 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,460
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Another thing, with those frogs it's not even about the money. There are animals that just anyone with $300 dollars shouldn't be able to get. I would not recommend them to anyone with less than at least a few years experience. Even the most experienced froggers often suffer mysterious losses with these types of pums, and even with all the knowledge in the world it can be a crapshoot.

Jordan
Reply With Quote
 
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:29 AM
NCSUdart's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 758
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

yeah, i should have mentioned that jordan. I have especially heard bad things about darklands, they can be very very touchy. if you don't have conditions just right they'll just drop dead.
__________________
LOTS OF FROGS
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 12:38 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 1,460
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Yes, but it's true with cayo's as well. Even the fattest and seemingly healthiest frog can just be gone. Even if the conditions are right they can die from a stressful event. Also, just because you can get something doesn't always mean it's a good idea. Darklands are more common in collections than you would think, but even if you get a chance to buy them unless you have experience with other rare and delicate frogs I would strongly advise against it.
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 01:08 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Georgia
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

See? I'm new to this hobby and I just don't know these things :? but I still love learning about them. Where do you learn advanced care for frogs? I mean aside from getting a phd in herpetology or becomming vet, neither of which is really practical. but then who ever said passion was practical.. seriously, where can I learn more? I have done searches and lurked around the board but It is hard to find specific information. And though I my never be ready to handle these oh so fragile little frogs I still want to learn about their care or just more info on the care of darts in general
__________________
Be Happy, Be Healthy, Be Blessed
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 01:19 AM
Frogtofall's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,827
Thanks: 74
Thanked 291 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Aside frome spending a good while reading the Advanced and Beginner's section, I would say the best way to obtain the knowledge is through experience. You can read all the books and forums you want, but nothing beats hands on. I feel very strongly about that.

Do enough research to get you started, then pick up a "beginner" pum like the Bastimentos or Man Creeks. These 2 seem to be the easiest to obtain and breed.
__________________
-Antone
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 01:19 AM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tadpole4
Where do you learn advanced care for frogs? I mean aside from getting a phd in herpetology or becomming vet, neither of which is really practical. but then who ever said passion was practical.. seriously, where can I learn more? I have done searches and lurked around the board but It is hard to find specific information.
TONS of experience, get info from people that have them. I'm not sure if anyone on this board has them or if they do, they probably don't want the whole community to pester them to get on a waiting list. Most of the comments on them are about stories or other people's experiences, not saying they're wrong. I wouldn't be surprised if they really were as sensitive people say. But realistically, I don't expect darklands or cayos to become as common as bastis or man creeks for a verrry long time. It would be nice, but good things like this almost never happen quickly. I agree with you, Darklands have been my favorite pumilio since I saw them, but IMO, I'd rather see them in the hands of an expert than with a "noob." That way, maybe if the experts figure out what makes them so difficult, noobs like me can have some.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 02:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 5,684
Thanks: 1
Thanked 104 Times in 69 Posts
Default

Having a PhD in Herpetology or being a Vet doesn't mean you'd know about these animals either! I know a number of people that are members of both parties that barely have a clue about PDFs in general, much less something as specific as a rarely seen morph (in the hobby) of one particular species.

Becoming an "advanced" keeper is mostly just about experience, which is gained over years of working with various different animals. Picking the brains of those who know also helps you get things straight, as well as will eventually get you thinking. Its ok to just know how, but experience and knowledge also have you knowing why, and knowing why, thinking about it, theorizing, not only helps you know the animals better, but also really take you that extra step that seems to seperate what some consider "experts" from just "keepers".
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 02:42 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: York, PA
Posts: 6,734
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Quote:
You can read all the books and forums you want, but nothing beats hands on. I feel very strongly about that.
So true in so many areas of life. Though in strong contrast, theory is one of the only ways to describe many things, as such they are rarely learned though experience.



__________________
-Mike

"This hobby is about 10% what you know, and 90% experimentation." - Lon Heim (DartMan)
Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 02:43 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,414
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KeroKero
Having a PhD in Herpetology or being a Vet doesn't mean you'd know about these animals either! I know a number of people that are members of both parties that barely have a clue about PDFs in general, much less something as specific as a rarely seen morph (in the hobby) of one particular species.

Becoming an "advanced" keeper is mostly just about experience, which is gained over years of working with various different animals. Picking the brains of those who know also helps you get things straight, as well as will eventually get you thinking. Its ok to just know how, but experience and knowledge also have you knowing why, and knowing why, thinking about it, theorizing, not only helps you know the animals better, but also really take you that extra step that seems to seperate what some consider "experts" from just "keepers".
Amen!
__________________
~Josh

Tree Walkers International
OFP Committee Member
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 02:48 AM
Frogtofall's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Florida
Posts: 6,827
Thanks: 74
Thanked 291 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by defaced
Quote:
You can read all the books and forums you want, but nothing beats hands on. I feel very strongly about that.
So true in so many areas of life. Though in strong contrast, theory is one of the only ways to describe many things, as such they are rarely learned through experience.
Yes sir! Master Yoda.

__________________
-Antone
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 03:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: York, PA
Posts: 6,734
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default

You'd think so by my long winded explainations of things. I just like to think of myself as the Corey or Ed of the technical stuff. Helps me not feel so bad about confusing the living daylights out of people with math and theory.



__________________
-Mike

"This hobby is about 10% what you know, and 90% experimentation." - Lon Heim (DartMan)
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-21-2006, 01:21 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Georgia
Posts: 508
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I really want to set up that bigger tank and put some great frogs but I want something smaller, and less common (as if any of these frogs are "common") I have been asking questions on the board and frankly I feel unequal to the task of raising thes frogs. There is just sooooo much to learn. I know the best way is experience, but gaining that experience is soooooo risky cause when you screw up it is another life at risk. not to mention the financial risk. And honestly to gain experience with the hardier frogs doesn't really prepare you for what to expect with the more fragile frogs. And then of course there is always the issue of space.

I don't have any plans to go running off the deep end and aquire a dozen different morphs of frogs right away, in fact it will likely be another 6 months to a year, I want to learn more and get some experience with the frogs I currently have.

I have been reading the forums here and on a few other sites, though on the others I'm just lurking. but the info is scattered and random. are there any books that you would recommend to a newbie like me to help get me more acclimated to the technicalities?
__________________
Be Happy, Be Healthy, Be Blessed
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
? about RO H2O & pums boombotty General Discussion 2 10-21-2008 11:31 PM
Some Pums almazan Member's Frogs & Vivariums 4 04-12-2008 09:27 PM
My five Pums defaced Member's Frogs & Vivariums 11 09-22-2006 10:27 PM
pics, wee pums Vicky Rut Member's Frogs & Vivariums 6 07-24-2006 08:07 PM
my pums Member's Frogs & Vivariums 2 06-05-2006 09:02 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 05:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.