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-   -   Temp and duration needed for sterilization (https://www.dendroboard.com/forum/general-discussion/9513-temp-duration-needed-sterilization.html)

Dane 01-24-2006 11:32 PM

Temp and duration needed for sterilization
 
What would be the recommended temperature for appropriate sterilization of wild collected wood or rocks, and how long would that need to be maintained to achieve the desired effect?

back2eight 01-25-2006 02:32 AM

I think there is another post about this, and it is 180 (?) degrees for four hours in an oven. That is what I am planning on doing, as soon as I get a free day I'm going wood/rock hunting.

fleenor1 01-25-2006 04:43 AM

If I can remember my Micro-biology class from college....
I would say boiling for ten minutes should work to kill most of the bad stuff.

Hope that helps!

Ed 01-25-2006 02:49 PM

the problems with boiling water is that the contact time is usually insufficient to allow penetration of all of the crevices and nooks and crannies for a sufficient length of time.

It depends on the pathogen that you want to control. the absolute best (and not a viable option for almost all of us) would be autoclaving as this will pretty much take care of everything. If you are mainly concerned about chytrid would be to simply get the core temperature (of the object) up to 120 F for 16 hours however if you can get the item bone dry (and it has to all be bone dry) then this will also kill the chytrid fungus.


Ed

Rain_Frog 01-25-2006 03:47 PM

what is autoclaving again Ed? I think you recommended I do that if I wanted to reuse cocopanels from other frog tanks. I'd want to kill worms/ nemetodes more than chytrids.

Dane 01-25-2006 07:03 PM

An autoclave is basically a pressure cooker used to heat water to temperatures above boiling. They're used in hospitals and vet's offices to sterilize surgical tools. I've looked into them for this kind of thing, but they typically run $300 or more, and have limited size capacity.

Ed 01-26-2006 12:36 AM

It depends on how much you want to process as a large pressure cooker runs about $100 new and can be used for small batches of items.

Ed

Rain_Frog 01-26-2006 02:18 AM

what is the temp required for killing worms/ parasites?

defaced 01-26-2006 04:48 AM

Most health departments say that "hot" food has to be above 140F, so I'd say that's a pretty good "low" bar. I usually go for boiling for things that can take it (rocks).



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Ed 01-27-2006 02:20 PM

As I said it depends on the parasite in question.

For example, in herps, you are not sure that you have killed anything in the cryptosporidia serpens complex (there appear to be several species here) unless you use straight household ammonia, live steam (which is above 212F), or autoclave. While cryptosporidia has not been well docmented in amphibians there are a couple of cases.

Here is some notation from a teaching lecture that gives some guidelines for bacterial and viral disinfection as anything that works on bacterial spores will kill most parasites. (some of the items to potenially worry about would be items like mycobacterial infections such as M. marinum )

see http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:7ED ... =clnk&cd=1)


Ed

Darryl 01-27-2006 03:39 PM

As was mentioned by both Ed and Dane a pressure cooker and autoclaves are just a wee bit on thje expesive side for anything less than regular use.

I use a poor mans method, that has worked for me to date:
I use boiling salt water, and then rinse several times with normal boiling water to get rid of salt residue. By doing this I rely on two thing to get rid of nasties, the first is the high temp (i.e. Boiling water) and the second is Salt osmosis.

Salt osmosis will kill most organisms that are not useto a high saline liquied enviroment.

Rain_Frog 01-27-2006 04:45 PM

there's always the use of a chemical agent such as potassium permanganate or copper safe to rid the stuff of parasites, but often porous substances will not be completely "cleaned" by the chemicals and often it will leach on afterwards.


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