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Old 07-23-2015, 04:29 PM
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Default How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Peanut Beetles



Popular names: Peanut Beetle, Peanut Bug, Moon Dragon, Cancer Beetle.
I have found 4 different scientific names for peanut beetles - Palembus dermestoides, Martianers dermestoides, Palembus ocularis, and Ulomoides dermestoides.

The peanut beetle is an insect of the order Coleoptera. The word "coleoptera" is from the Greek κολεός, koleos, meaning "sheath"; and πτερόν, pteron, meaning "wing", thus "sheathed wing", because most beetles have two pairs of wings, the front pair, the "elytra", being hardened and thickened into a shell-like protection for the rear pair and the beetle's abdomen.

Peanut beetles are small, flightless, dark brown beetles. The larvae of this insect are often used to feed fish, birds and small reptiles.

It is likely that the peanut beetle originated in China. It was introduced in several countries via contaminated foods and for therapeutic purposes. Folk medicine believes that the larvae and even adult beetles have the power to treat conditions such as eye irritation, rheumatism, asthma, tuberculosis arthritis and even sexual impotence. Believers ingest larvae or beetles live, with water, yogurt or other liquids. These therapeutic properties are not proven by science.

Nutritional Value



P. dermestoides are high in protein, low in fat, have diverse amino acids, and are rich in minerals and trace elements compared with a normal protein resource.



During analysis, the content of Zn was up to 101.00 and 163.00 mg/kg, with no Cd, Hg and Pb found. The index of the essential amino acid was 114.71.

Life Cycle

Reproduction is sexual (male and female individuals). Sexual dimorphism is subtle, if present at all.

To reach adult size, the insect goes through four stages: egg, larva, pupa and beetle. Importantly, the duration of each cycle varies according to several external factors, such as temperature, humidity, nutrition, etc. Ideally, the temperature inside the culture should remain between 20 (68) and 30 (86) degrees Celsius. At 28 (82) degrees, the last stage is reached in about 77 days.

1.Eggs: Eggs are laid by females in the substrate and within the peanut kernels. Incubation takes between 1 and 2 weeks. Each female in their reproductive period lays about 200 eggs.

2.Larvae: The second stage lasts about 2 months. These larvae have a chitin shell of yellowish color that does not follow their growth, so it is exchanged 5 to 10 times until the larvae reach their maximum size of 10mm (~3/8").

3.Pupae: The third phase is the transition between the larva and the beetle. The pupa is almost motionless and curves like a letter "C". This phase is critical due to the danger of dehydration. It can last up to a week.

4.Beetles: After going through 3 stages, this insect reaches its final stage which is in the form of an adult beetle, measuring 5mm (~3/16") in length. Adult beetles may live up to 20 months.



Culture Setup

Housing: The peanut beetles should be kept in plastic containers or glass tanks. Although the beetles are incapable of climbing the smooth walls and do not fly, an escape-proof lid is strongly recommended (based on their diet, it is very clear that these beetles can become pests/infestation should they reach a pantry or food stock). Cultures should be placed on diatomaceous earth or mite paper in order to reduce mite infestations.

The container should be well ventilated (many pin holes or mesh top) to reduce condensation and subsequent molding of the substrate. Mold is the cultures’ main threat.

My setup:



Substrate: The arachidonic acid in peanuts is essential for these beetles. Although they can live on raw peanuts alone, a more nutritious substrate will yield better results. Make new cultures using a layer of raw plain oatmeal and/or bulgur wheat and/or wheat bran, followed by a layer of raw peanuts in shell or shelled and dried bread slices.



Added peanuts on top:





Water: Vegetables and fruits’ slices provide the animals with all the water they need. Cabbage/lettuce stems, banana peel, potato or carrot slices, watermelon peel, apple cores and skin, etc. are good source of water for the beetles. Replace these vegetables when dry or moldy.

Cleaning/New Cultures: In time, a layer of powder will form on the container bottom. When lots of powder has accumulated, use a sieve to separate the powder. Put the content of the sieve (larvae, pupae, beetles, and substrate) in a new box. Put the powder in a plastic bag and freeze it overnight to kill eggs and small larvae. Flush the frozen powder.

CAUTION:

Animals: There have been reports of fatalities in lizards such as Anolis after consumption of adult beetles.

Humans: People around the world are consuming these beetles as treatment for different illnesses such as asthma, Parkinson's, diabetes, arthritis, HIV and specially cancer. There are adverse effects: A study demonstrated that defence compounds of Ulomoides dermestoides reduced cell viability and induced DNA damage. The insect benzoquinones are primarily responsible for inducing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in culture cells.

There have also been reports of adverse effects associated with consuming the larvae.

Sources
Photos:
Besouro Do Amendoim (Alimento Vivo) Criação e reprodução. - Aquarismo Online [AqOL]
Nutritional Facts:
Determination of nutritional components of in Palembus dermestoides | Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO) | US EPA
Culture Setup:
Random Hobbies: Beetles That Can Cure Cancer
REPTILEFOODSTORE
(http://www.)forumamordepeixe.com.br/...ualbesouro.pdf
Caution:
Pharmacologically active natural products in the defence secretion of Palembus ocularis (Tenebrionidae, Coleoptera). - PubMed - NCBI
Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of defence secretion of Ulomoides dermestoides on A549 cells
An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie
Vitae - CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTI-IRRITANT CAPACITY OF WHOLE BODY EXTRACTS OF Ulomoides dermestoides (COLEOPTERA, TENEBRIONIDAE)

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http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/foo...les-video.html
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Old 07-23-2015, 04:40 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

My culture (started on 5/20 with about 20 beetles) is now big enough to harvest larvae. This was from yesterday.



To harvest, I use a piece of fruit to which beetles and larvae are attached (in my case, an apple core).

I scraped the animals off the core into a plastic cup, then I returned the beetles to the culture. Return the large larvae as well if you have small frogs.

Feed in a petri dish.
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Old 10-17-2015, 11:33 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

My initial attempt with peanut beetles has exploded! I was able to segregate my small 4oz starter culture into two 16oz deli cups with vented poly lids, and my first wave of adults just started hatching out. I have fed out larvae from my original cultures several times without any significant decrease in eventual adult population. I have fed the larvae and pupae out to vittatus, tinctorius, and auratus with good success so far. Thanks JP!
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Old 10-17-2015, 11:56 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

So what's up with the benzoquinones? Why does it seem to be toxic but you are feeding it to the frogs. Are the frogs immune to it or something, isn't benzoquinone part of their natural diet that makes darts poisonous?
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Old 10-17-2015, 11:59 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Jp:these are interesting. Bigger than floir beetle larvae?

How are your sawtooths doing? My cultures have been neglected and I suspect the media was not to their liking as a friend I gave some to reported better production than I got. I went ahead and made some switches.
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Old 10-19-2015, 03:50 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rushthezeppelin View Post
So what's up with the benzoquinones? Why does it seem to be toxic but you are feeding it to the frogs. Are the frogs immune to it or something, isn't benzoquinone part of their natural diet that makes darts poisonous?
I am not recommending people to feed beetles to frogs, as can be seen in the "caution" part of the write up. As with the lesser (buffalo) mealworm, I am keeping this species of darkling beetle simply for their larvae. It is my understanding that the larvae do not produce benzoquinone compounds.

I will defer your question about PDF's natural diet to someone with a scientific background.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dendrobait View Post
Jp:these are interesting. Bigger than floir beetle larvae?

How are your sawtooths doing? My cultures have been neglected and I suspect the media was not to their liking as a friend I gave some to reported better production than I got. I went ahead and made some switches.
Larvae of peanut beetle can get to 10mm, so it would be double the size of flour beetle larvae.

My sawtooth culture never took off and it is kind of hard to harvest. I mostly gave up on that one.
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Old 10-19-2015, 09:41 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

This is how my culture looks today.
upload_-1.jpg
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Old 10-19-2015, 10:11 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

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Originally Posted by JPccusa View Post
This is how my culture looks today.
Attachment 195154
Like tribbles...

I'm so glad they can't climb containers.
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Old 12-17-2015, 07:08 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Anyone know of any sellers of Peanut Beetle cultures?
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Old 12-17-2015, 08:50 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Peanut Beetles | Roaches for sale | Cape Cod Roaches- dubia, discoid, hissers pet

Maybe someone on DB already culturing peanut beetles are able/willing to ship you some?
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Old 12-17-2015, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Not sure how much it matters to the frogs but peanuts tend to have large amounts of pesticide residue in them.
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Old 04-27-2017, 01:11 AM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Anybody still working with these? Wondering if they are easy and worth the trouble. Seem like they may be hard to separate from the substrate.
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Old 04-27-2017, 02:51 AM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

I got mine from JP almost two years ago. I've only fed out about a dozen times. They are incredibly hardy, and can tolerate lengthy neglect, but they only have realistic prey value for larger frogs, and separating the larvae is a bit of a pain. I'd equate them with Rice Flour Beetle worms, except that my frogs have taken peanut beetle larvae with greater gusto than RFB.
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Last edited by Dane; 04-27-2017 at 02:55 AM.
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Old 04-27-2017, 03:00 AM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Very cool thanks. I'm always interested in expanding the menu but try do so with things that require minimal effort. Which is why I like bean beetles, so easy. These guys seem like a bit more trouble.

I tried termites and they all died after one feeding LoL no idea why...

Quote:
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I got mine from JP almost two years ago. I've only fed out about a dozen times. They are incredibly hardy, and can tolerate lengthy neglect, but they only have realistic prey value for larger frogs, and separating the larvae is a bit of a pain. I'd equate them with Rice Flour Beetle worms, except that my frogs have taken peanut beetle larvae with greater gusto than RFB.
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Old 05-29-2020, 03:47 AM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Hello, I'm new member and been looking to buy some peanut beetles but don't know where and how to get them. Does anyone know?
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:25 AM
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Default Re: How to Culture Peanut Beetles

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPccusa View Post
Peanut Beetles



Popular names: Peanut Beetle, Peanut Bug, Moon Dragon, Cancer Beetle.
I have found 4 different scientific names for peanut beetles - Palembus dermestoides, Martianers dermestoides, Palembus ocularis, and Ulomoides dermestoides.

The peanut beetle is an insect of the order Coleoptera. The word "coleoptera" is from the Greek κολεός, koleos, meaning "sheath"; and πτερόν, pteron, meaning "wing", thus "sheathed wing", because most beetles have two pairs of wings, the front pair, the "elytra", being hardened and thickened into a shell-like protection for the rear pair and the beetle's abdomen.

Peanut beetles are small, flightless, dark brown beetles. The larvae of this insect are often used to feed fish, birds and small reptiles.

It is likely that the peanut beetle originated in China. It was introduced in several countries via contaminated foods and for therapeutic purposes. Folk medicine believes that the larvae and even adult beetles have the power to treat conditions such as eye irritation, rheumatism, asthma, tuberculosis arthritis and even sexual impotence. Believers ingest larvae or beetles live, with water, yogurt or other liquids. These therapeutic properties are not proven by science.

Nutritional Value



P. dermestoides are high in protein, low in fat, have diverse amino acids, and are rich in minerals and trace elements compared with a normal protein resource.



During analysis, the content of Zn was up to 101.00 and 163.00 mg/kg, with no Cd, Hg and Pb found. The index of the essential amino acid was 114.71.

Life Cycle

Reproduction is sexual (male and female individuals). Sexual dimorphism is subtle, if present at all.

To reach adult size, the insect goes through four stages: egg, larva, pupa and beetle. Importantly, the duration of each cycle varies according to several external factors, such as temperature, humidity, nutrition, etc. Ideally, the temperature inside the culture should remain between 20 (68) and 30 (86) degrees Celsius. At 28 (82) degrees, the last stage is reached in about 77 days.

1.Eggs: Eggs are laid by females in the substrate and within the peanut kernels. Incubation takes between 1 and 2 weeks. Each female in their reproductive period lays about 200 eggs.

2.Larvae: The second stage lasts about 2 months. These larvae have a chitin shell of yellowish color that does not follow their growth, so it is exchanged 5 to 10 times until the larvae reach their maximum size of 10mm (~3/8").

3.Pupae: The third phase is the transition between the larva and the beetle. The pupa is almost motionless and curves like a letter "C". This phase is critical due to the danger of dehydration. It can last up to a week.

4.Beetles: After going through 3 stages, this insect reaches its final stage which is in the form of an adult beetle, measuring 5mm (~3/16") in length. Adult beetles may live up to 20 months.



Culture Setup

Housing: The peanut beetles should be kept in plastic containers or glass tanks. Although the beetles are incapable of climbing the smooth walls and do not fly, an escape-proof lid is strongly recommended (based on their diet, it is very clear that these beetles can become pests/infestation should they reach a pantry or food stock). Cultures should be placed on diatomaceous earth or mite paper in order to reduce mite infestations.

The container should be well ventilated (many pin holes or mesh top) to reduce condensation and subsequent molding of the substrate. Mold is the cultures’ main threat.

My setup:



Substrate: The arachidonic acid in peanuts is essential for these beetles. Although they can live on raw peanuts alone, a more nutritious substrate will yield better results. Make new cultures using a layer of raw plain oatmeal and/or bulgur wheat and/or wheat bran, followed by a layer of raw peanuts in shell or shelled and dried bread slices.



Added peanuts on top:





Water: Vegetables and fruits’ slices provide the animals with all the water they need. Cabbage/lettuce stems, banana peel, potato or carrot slices, watermelon peel, apple cores and skin, etc. are good source of water for the beetles. Replace these vegetables when dry or moldy.

Cleaning/New Cultures: In time, a layer of powder will form on the container bottom. When lots of powder has accumulated, use a sieve to separate the powder. Put the content of the sieve (larvae, pupae, beetles, and substrate) in a new box. Put the powder in a plastic bag and freeze it overnight to kill eggs and small larvae. Flush the frozen powder.

CAUTION:

Animals: There have been reports of fatalities in lizards such as Anolis after consumption of adult beetles.

Humans: People around the world are consuming these beetles as treatment for different illnesses such as asthma, Parkinson's, diabetes, arthritis, HIV and specially cancer. There are adverse effects: A study demonstrated that defence compounds of Ulomoides dermestoides reduced cell viability and induced DNA damage. The insect benzoquinones are primarily responsible for inducing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in culture cells.

There have also been reports of adverse effects associated with consuming the larvae.

Sources
Photos:
Besouro Do Amendoim (Alimento Vivo) Criação e reprodução. - Aquarismo Online [AqOL]
Nutritional Facts:
Determination of nutritional components of in Palembus dermestoides | Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO) | US EPA
Culture Setup:
Random Hobbies: Beetles That Can Cure Cancer
REPTILEFOODSTORE
(http://www.)forumamordepeixe.com.br/...ualbesouro.pdf
Caution:
Pharmacologically active natural products in the defence secretion of Palembus ocularis (Tenebrionidae, Coleoptera). - PubMed - NCBI
Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of defence secretion of Ulomoides dermestoides on A549 cells
An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie
Vitae - CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND ANTI-IRRITANT CAPACITY OF WHOLE BODY EXTRACTS OF Ulomoides dermestoides (COLEOPTERA, TENEBRIONIDAE)

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http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/foo...les-video.html
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/beg...w-project.html
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/foo...mestoides.html
http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/foo...t-beetles.html
Sharing tips on how to raise frogs quickly, as far as I know, during the process of raising, I usually crush garlic and mix it into food and feed frogs daily. Thanks to this method, my family's frogs are always healthy.
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