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Old 02-13-2020, 04:36 AM
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Default R. imitator froglets

I typically have let the parents raise the tads, but have pulled some eggs for numerous reasons (watch them develop, or bad egg placement). These are R. imitator 'Chazuta'.

I've followed much of the advice garnered from this site and other sources, most of which says once the front legs appear (or break free from the body), the tads stop feeding until their tail is absorbed.

The question for me is, when exactly do they start feeding again? I've moved them to grow out bins once they have absorbed all visible tail, but they often seem quite lethargic for a few days (3-4?) before they begin to explore a bit more. Should I be leaving them in their more semi-aquatic environment longer (32oz deli + almond leaves + java moss), but with no food?

I provide spring tails, and small amounts of fruit flies right away, but don't see them actively hunting at this point. I haven't lost any, but this question has always lingered with me.

Appreciate any experience you can share!
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Old 02-13-2020, 08:29 AM
Kmc Kmc is offline
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

I haven't bred imitators but I've raised a lot of tads and baby froglets and what I have found is that the more air exchange they had the quicker their carriage and motor function tightens up. Oxygen blood levels are basal to all functions and perhaps there are oxygen regulatory mechanisms in the lungs and skin that need to stabilize in what is arguably, a frogs most dramatic somatic state.

I realize this may sound out of the box and in contention with what / how many people have done it with collective and multiple thousands of froglets in the hobby, but Im sharing it. Its only fresh air, a little more may be worth trying out for anyone who may be curious to note their own observations and results.
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Old 02-13-2020, 04:43 PM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

In my experience with ranitomeya I wait until the front legs emerge from the body at which point I leave the small cup with the froglet containing about 1 cm of water at a 45 degree angle inside a larger container filled with soaked sphagnum moss and tiny bit of leaf litter. I've noticed froglets will come in and out of water during the period of the tail disappearing. In case they leave the cup early the soaked sphagnum will keep the humidity >90%. They will usually not eat for 3-5 days after emerging from water and with the tail gone.
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Old 02-13-2020, 09:13 PM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

Neonate and transitional care of amphibians is a special interest of mine.

The provision of shallow water to froglets seems to be another outside the box thing, which I find somewhat confounding. I think the fear of drowning is overestimated and easily preventable.

Your streamlined, efficient modality with tilted cups is valuable.

I have always provided a shallow pool and plenty of air exchange with good success.

Air and Water.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:22 PM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

Both responses are very helpful, thank you!

I use a very similar method with the tilted cup, once the front legs emerge. 3-5 days after the tail is gone makes me feel a bit better. Perhaps I should be leaving them in a cup a little bit longer. I only move them so I can get them in an environment with spring tails, and to try and get some powdered food in them (calcium/VitD/A, etc.). My major concern was food, but if they aren't eating...I might as well leave them.

The froglets I see in the tanks (There are about 4 now, from the same parents) developed faster, and emerged faster than my "artificially" raised ones, and I often find they are using the water pools in the bromeliads constantly - but I am curious if this is more of a safety net for the young froglets, to escape from predation.

In terms of air exchange...my cups have a vented lid, but other than that I don't typically open them during the process. Do you feel this is sufficient in your thinking?

Again, I haven't had any mortality with my current methods, but it is interesting to observe and try to improve - or even just learn a bit!

Appreciate the comments guys.

Last edited by Chris S; 02-13-2020 at 11:23 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-14-2020, 12:44 AM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

I fully realize the success of modalities that dont do as I have done, but through the years have used my own techniques with success in bringing along strong babies.

There seems to be great emphasis in creating a high RH, which I have never found necessary with contact moisture and osmotic hydration provision.

Counter-intuitively i have found it more controllable to provide osmotic hydration, air exchange and a 'dryer' perching option as respite from all moist situ and have never had a neonate desiccate from not breathing humid air.

Some of my animals came in, as 'lots counts' shipped in deli cups and were weak but brought to flourish, shocking my employer who was in the exotics business since 1987.

These 'EMT' measures being successful might surely have some inherent general merit of factor.
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Old 02-14-2020, 12:52 AM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris S View Post



The froglets I see in the tanks (There are about 4 now, from the same parents) developed faster, and emerged faster than my "artificially" raised ones, and I often find they are using the water pools in the bromeliads constantly -
Yes, the above situ surpasses all of my micromanaging to provide said factors, in a big, holistic format.
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Old 02-14-2020, 02:49 AM
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Default Re: R. imitator froglets

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Originally Posted by Kmc View Post

Counter-intuitively i have found it more controllable to provide osmotic hydration, air exchange and a 'dryer' perching option as respite from all moist situ and have never had a neonate desiccate from not breathing humid air.
I've been finding the above to be true generally for all the Ranitomeya/Oophaga frogs, adult or froglet, I keep - where I had the initial understanding that 80% humidity or more was necessary for their survival.

Not only do a mist about 50% less than I used to in their tank, I've noticed there are tons of micro-climates within the tanks, where the frogs are more than capable of visiting when needed (bromeliads being one of these climates).

Please do keep in mind I have only ~2 years in the hobby now.
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