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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-19-2017, 03:52 AM
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Default Inexpensive misting setup discovery

I stumbled onto something that might be super helpful to someone out there wanting a mist setup but without the budget.

I just got done installing a drip wall using an Avast diaphragm pump. I used a needle (actually a metal floral staple) to punch holes in airline tube that were roughly an inch apart. I hooked the tube up to the avast pump and, low and behold, I got very fine streams of water that were going about 25 inches across my tank... and on my walls and lights and face and carpet lol.

It would not be hard to simply snake airline tube across or around the top of you viv and make this work as a misting like setup.

To make it work as a drip wall I simply wrapped spag around the airline tube and it created a giant wick. I stuffed this in between the top of my tank and tree fern panels and bam evenly damp tree fern panels in my tank that will grow whatever I want.

In any case, the avast diaphragm pump is powerful and comes with a little flow control to put on the inlet if you need it. The entire setup was only about 50 bucks.

Pump is a bit noisy. I'm going to buy a little box from a craft store and pack it with foam to make a muffler box.

I tried dual aqua lifters first to do the drip wall. It was a waste of time. This pump 1000 times more reliable and powerful. It is basically what aqualifters should be.

For a misting application I would suggest poking the holes after putting the tube where you want it so you can kinda aim the spray. You might even be able to find some kind of premade mist tubing to get a mist rather the a fine spray. This pump does 60psi which is more then most home plumbing so pressure probably won't be a problem.

Anyway, just thought I share because I've never seen these mentioned on here before and they are awesome little pumps

Last edited by Noxtreme; 04-19-2017 at 03:59 AM. Reason: Title change
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Old 04-19-2017, 04:10 AM
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Default Re: Inexpensive misting setup discovery

Pics or it didn't happen
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Old 04-19-2017, 04:29 AM
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Smile Re: Inexpensive misting setup discovery

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheForSaken View Post
Pics or it didn't happen
This is actually after I kinda got the spray under control lol but it really happened!

https://youtu.be/EXPnKnGwM_8
Encyclia and TheForSaken like this.

Last edited by Noxtreme; 04-19-2017 at 04:33 AM. Reason: Because I wanted to
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Old 04-19-2017, 11:34 PM
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Default Re: Inexpensive misting setup discovery

I wouldn't call that misting. It's more of a drip system. Which, if you want drip and not mist, is great. Sometimes that is indeed what you want, and sometimes mist sucks. Some animals love a drip - or a spray - and just hate - or can't really use - a foggy mist.

Long ago, I built a DIY drip system for watering arboreal snakes when I was away on long vacations or work assignments. It consisted of a crappy old analog dial timer, a bulkheaded reservoir (big trash can in my case), a small pond pump, and a variety of drip/spray irrigation hardware ("spaghetti tubing", elbows, tees, adjustable emitters, etc). It worked great. The emitters were the lowest-flow ones I could find, something like 1 gph, wide-open. They had little turn-cranks that you could adjust all the way down to absolutely nothing, or go wide-open, or dial up anything in between. This was important because the emitters nearest a pump will always, just naturally, pass the most water, and will need to be cranked down if you want the emitters way out on the end, around a bunch of corners and down a mile of tubing, to get anything. Those distal emitters will need to be relatively wide open.

The nice thing (besides being dirt cheap) about those drip emitters, versus mist emitters, is they were almost impossible to clog. I used high-pH tap water for years, no problem. Also - and this is important - I could get an actual spray out of them, not just slow drops, if I wanted (and if there weren't too many emitters, and if the total head between the reservoir and the emitters was well within the pump's abilities). But a caveat - you need a big reservoir, and you need cage drains and a drainage-dump, because you're gonna be moving quite a lot of water. Placement of the emitters matters, or you'll drown plants. You also need a decent timer - the old analogs were awful (quarter-hour minimum run-time; every day required), but now that you can get electronic timers down to the single minute or even single second (MistKing timers rock!), as little as one day per week, it's vastly easier to not soak or drown everything.

Anyway, thanks for sharing, and for the trip down memory lane. Now I have a lot more money and a lot less time than I did 20 years ago. One of the features of aging, ha ha. Now I have several MistKing pumps (one for each timed "zone" of my herp room - some stuff gets it twice a day, some stuff gets it twice a week) and quite a lot of associated hardware. It's great stuff, if you can use a foggy mist, and if you can spare the coin. It's modular though - you can start small and add as you go. But, I would still recommend the landscaping drip (or really, spray) emitter set-up to anyone with the time and handiness to try it out. Especially if your cages each have drains, and better yet, if your basement has a floor drain! It is very unlikely you will lose animals due to a clogged emitter and a long vacation co-occurring. Not sure I can say that about true misters. I double up, 2 misters per cage, for that very reason. Cuts the low odds of a very consequential event, in half. Redundancy is good when life's at stake...

cheers
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Old 04-20-2017, 02:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgragg View Post
I wouldn't call that misting. It's more of a drip system. Which, if you want drip and not mist, is great. Sometimes that is indeed what you want, and sometimes mist sucks. Some animals love a drip - or a spray - and just hate - or can't really use - a foggy mist.

Long ago, I built a DIY drip system for watering arboreal snakes when I was away on long vacations or work assignments. It consisted of a crappy old analog dial timer, a bulkheaded reservoir (big trash can in my case), a small pond pump, and a variety of drip/spray irrigation hardware ("spaghetti tubing", elbows, tees, adjustable emitters, etc). It worked great. The emitters were the lowest-flow ones I could find, something like 1 gph, wide-open. They had little turn-cranks that you could adjust all the way down to absolutely nothing, or go wide-open, or dial up anything in between. This was important because the emitters nearest a pump will always, just naturally, pass the most water, and will need to be cranked down if you want the emitters way out on the end, around a bunch of corners and down a mile of tubing, to get anything. Those distal emitters will need to be relatively wide open.

The nice thing (besides being dirt cheap) about those drip emitters, versus mist emitters, is they were almost impossible to clog. I used high-pH tap water for years, no problem. Also - and this is important - I could get an actual spray out of them, not just slow drops, if I wanted (and if there weren't too many emitters, and if the total head between the reservoir and the emitters was well within the pump's abilities). But a caveat - you need a big reservoir, and you need cage drains and a drainage-dump, because you're gonna be moving quite a lot of water. Placement of the emitters matters, or you'll drown plants. You also need a decent timer - the old analogs were awful (quarter-hour minimum run-time; every day required), but now that you can get electronic timers down to the single minute or even single second (MistKing timers rock!), as little as one day per week, it's vastly easier to not soak or drown everything.

Anyway, thanks for sharing, and for the trip down memory lane. Now I have a lot more money and a lot less time than I did 20 years ago. One of the features of aging, ha ha. Now I have several MistKing pumps (one for each timed "zone" of my herp room - some stuff gets it twice a day, some stuff gets it twice a week) and quite a lot of associated hardware. It's great stuff, if you can use a foggy mist, and if you can spare the coin. It's modular though - you can start small and add as you go. But, I would still recommend the landscaping drip (or really, spray) emitter set-up to anyone with the time and handiness to try it out. Especially if your cages each have drains, and better yet, if your basement has a floor drain! It is very unlikely you will lose animals due to a clogged emitter and a long vacation co-occurring. Not sure I can say that about true misters. I double up, 2 misters per cage, for that very reason. Cuts the low odds of a very consequential event, in half. Redundancy is good when life's at stake...

cheers
Agree with everything. I've got the mist king tier 2 pump with 4 nozzles and the digital seconds timer. Overkill but works like a dream.

I was excited by the possibility these 3 parts and about 50 bucks had. Hose, flow control and pump. Literally took 30 min to set up including poking all the holes in the tubing. Only stabbed myself twice. Unlike the setup you mentioned the pressure seems even across the runs and I basically have 4. 2 are very short and 2 that are about 16 inches. Probably because of the psi this pump puts out and how tiny the holes are. In any case, add the little pre-filter that is used for an aqua lifter and/or use RO or Distilled and you would be pretty set until you felt like upgrading.

I'm mainly wanting to say this pump is awesome for many applications. I could see it used for a mist pump, drain pump, drip wall pump, even a waterfall pump. Keep in mind, it's not rated for continuous use but it does not need to be in the tank and it has 130 feet of head so you could put it in the the shed out back and it would still work fine lol. There are a thousand other uses this pump would excell in but I'll leave it at that.

I'm pumping water from under my false bottom through this system so I'm sure it's going to clog sooner or later but whatever. Recycling the water into the tree fern panels without having a pump in the tank, how cool is that! I'll get the prefilter and try some soaker tube maybe when it clogs up to see if that works even better.

Anyway, the avast diaphragm pump looses half a star for noise but it is a unique and awesome product for sure.
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Old 04-20-2017, 05:25 PM
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Default Re: Inexpensive misting setup discovery

That's an intriguing pump. I've got a little Tom's dosing pump for drip wall use. (A "dual aqua lifter" as you mention.) I also love not having pumps in my cages - strike that, I refuse to have a pump in a cage - and the Tom's is fine (IMO; maybe "adequate for my needs" is a better way to put it?) for that use. The head capacity is only 30 inches though, with flow rate something like 3-4 gph. It would not serve as the pump for my old irrigation-gear setup. Way too wimpy. I think my little old pond pump had 6 feet of head but did ~60 gph. I didn't have too many heads (maybe 20?) but I did have some big, tall cages - I used most of the head, and had lots of line and connections. Hence the distal pressure drop-off.

130 feet of head is, uh, pretty incredible. I wonder what that Avast jobbie could do with a bunch of drip irrigation emitters? Blow them all off the tubing? Ha ha. Hello, big mess.

So - what are you doing for flow control? Some kind of ball valve on the output line? And, are you using a manifold or just tees and elbows?

Thanks very much for bringing this pump to our attention. It does look very, very interesting. I've had to build noise boxes for other pumps in the past, that's no problem at all. Who doesn't have tons of foam scraps laying around? Ha ha ha...

cheers
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Old 04-21-2017, 04:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgragg View Post
That's an intriguing pump. I've got a little Tom's dosing pump for drip wall use. (A "dual aqua lifter" as you mention.) I also love not having pumps in my cages - strike that, I refuse to have a pump in a cage - and the Tom's is fine (IMO; maybe "adequate for my needs" is a better way to put it?) for that use. The head capacity is only 30 inches though, with flow rate something like 3-4 gph. It would not serve as the pump for my old irrigation-gear setup. Way too wimpy. I think my little old pond pump had 6 feet of head but did ~60 gph. I didn't have too many heads (maybe 20?) but I did have some big, tall cages - I used most of the head, and had lots of line and connections. Hence the distal pressure drop-off.

130 feet of head is, uh, pretty incredible. I wonder what that Avast jobbie could do with a bunch of drip irrigation emitters? Blow them all off the tubing? Ha ha. Hello, big mess.

So - what are you doing for flow control? Some kind of ball valve on the output line? And, are you using a manifold or just tees and elbows?

Thanks very much for bringing this pump to our attention. It does look very, very interesting. I've had to build noise boxes for other pumps in the past, that's no problem at all. Who doesn't have tons of foam scraps laying around? Ha ha ha...

cheers

It actually comes with some nice clear tube and a little plastic ball valve or needle valve (I don't know which but it rotates 360 and goes from 0 to 100% in 180degrees). I put it near the pump on the in line because that is how the instructions showed it. It also comes with a check valve but i didn't use it because it's not needed in this system.

I measured everything and figured everything out before buying the toms aqua lifters and was surprised when they just couldn't do it. I reconfigured and retested with the toms aqualifter setup and they worked for a few hours before the already weak flow totally stopped. I then took the lifters off, tore them all the way down, cleaned them, put them back together and then did some testing outside the tank. They are so weak and finicky! Kinda ridiculous.

Figuring out how to disassemble the toms taught me it was a dypham pump I wanted. This in turn lead me to the avast pump.

This one you hook up the hoses and put it wherever and it pumps water lol. Sounds dumb but after researching it seems this is pretty much the only pump that has good power and pressure unless you go commercial or parastaltic.

I have three parastaltic pumps from my old plated tank and they don't move the volume I wanted. High volume parastaltic pumps are loud. Commercial pumps are hard to figure out and hard to get sometimes. Pond pumps need a resivoir or depth of water i don't have in my tank, Not to mention that meant putting a pump in my tank if I wanted to recycle the water.

Bla bla bla

In other words a diaphragm style pump was the way to go for me and this is the best option period if you want reliability and plenty of power.
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Old 04-21-2017, 05:23 AM
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Sry forgot to answer about the setup:
About 30 inch line goes from Under the false bottom in the tank (there is a make shift filter on the end of the tube) up and out of the tank then down under the stand to the flow control. Then about 6 more inches of tube go to the in of the pump. Then back out to 20 or so inchs of tube which hits a T into two 6 or so inch leader lines going into two more Ts. The spray tubes then run both directions off of those Ts.

The out might not make a lot of sense but its because I have a corner tank with a sealed front and open back... I'll be doing my build thread soon to show off this creation.
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Old 04-22-2017, 04:00 PM
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Default Re: Inexpensive misting setup discovery

Ah, thanks for the answer. One observation if I might - restricting flow on the intake side is generally "not how they say to do it" with pumps. Usually "they say" to stick a restrictor on the output side. This might have more or less relevance with specific technologies though - if you know, I would love to hear.

Quote:
Pond pumps need a resivoir or depth of water i don't have in my tank, Not to mention that meant putting a pump in my tank if I wanted to recycle the water.
My old recirc set-up had 2 containers of water. One received drainage from my cages, and had a kind of biofilter the water all had to gravity-feed through. That trash can had a toilet float-valve that controlled a submerged pump, that kicked water into another can. From that can, I had a timer-controlled canister filter (~250gph) that seriously filtered the entire volume (~20g) about 4 times a day. Also from that can, I had the pond pump going to my irrigation heads and spray bars.

Kinda ghetto, but it really worked for the animals. And for me. The internet barely existed back then, there was no Amazon, UPS had not yet gotten so huge, etc etc. A different time, it was. Importantly, the entire system volume could fit in either of the trash cans. So a power or pump or filter malfunction could not result in a flood - only a clogged drain could do that.
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