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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 07-02-2006, 12:37 AM
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But with all those spare blatta lateralis I bet you could keep some captive ones fat and happy. Maybe keep them in soda bottles with the bottoms cut off and placed over a sheet of paper for easy cleanup.
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1.3 Epipedobates anthonyi 'Santa Isabel'
1.1 Oophaga pumilio 'Isla Cristobal'
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2006, 03:55 AM
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I was just talking with someone tonight, and they are taking care of someone's tarantula (and a few other animals) while this person is getting ready to move down to California. Since they're making such a big move (which will be right after getting married) they are wanting to sell everything.

When I heard that I immediately thought of this thread. Not sure if any of you are looking for more arachnids, but the folks who are animal sitting said they would find out what species it is from the owner and pass it along to me. I'll post it once I find out, and if any of you are interested, just let me know.
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Old 07-03-2006, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Dendrobait wrote:

Can anyone guess what is in this photo?
I'd say a water strider.
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Old 07-03-2006, 03:59 PM
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Bingo!

Click the image to open in full size.


And just for fun eggs and a baby.
Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
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1.3 Epipedobates anthonyi 'Santa Isabel'
1.1 Oophaga pumilio 'Isla Cristobal'
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Old 07-05-2006, 08:38 AM
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Very nice photographic documentation!
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1.1 -- D. pumilio "Man Creek"
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Old 07-07-2006, 07:04 PM
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Mud Wasp:
Click the image to open in full size.

Dragonfly:
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 07-07-2006, 10:58 PM
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oooo I lik this forum allready.. :lol:

you are all going to think im crazy...

Campnonotus pennsylvanicus
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Aphaenogaster fulva
Click the image to open in full size.

Formica sp's
Click the image to open in full size.

Tetramorium sp's
Click the image to open in full size.

If you click you get bigger pictures.
Ants queens, they are alll brooding now!
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Old 07-08-2006, 03:02 AM
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nepenthes--Wow, a myrmecologist!

I love ants. How did you end up with all those queens?


tyler--wonderful shots! How on earth did you get that dragonfly to hold still?
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Old 07-08-2006, 03:27 AM
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Ichneumonid, Olypic National Park, 2004:

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 07-08-2006, 05:21 AM
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Yes myrmacology is amazing! all these queens were found around MY HOUSE!!!! Some I was scared off (carpenter ants = Camponotmus and I have two sp's though C. pennyslvanicus is very common out hear (north east US)

I boosted this colony with another colony of the same sp's and you get a bunch of callow workers! (lightly colored)
Click the image to open in full size.

I just love social insects all to gether and the parasites that have coupled with them!

Like The Parasitic ants, and ants that steal other Sp's Eggs (I have a colony of them they are Solepsis molesta closely related to Fire ants and are monogynus multiple ants)

LOL, any ways! Those are beautiful wasps are those males? I dont know much about the anatomy of wasps.

thanks!
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Old 07-08-2006, 06:35 AM
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Yes, the whole ant ecological system--so very cool. I once had 5 colonies going on my dining room table. As you say, it's the commensals, parasites, etc., that are so fascinating. We were once digging up a colony of harvester ants (in very cold weather, when they were pretty comatose) and found an embedded colony of minute yellow ants, the tiniest I've ever seen.

I like your latest picture. I'm not sure I understand what you wrote about them. Are they different castes of the same species or some slave species? Do you get your queens by capturing alates during swarms, or do you have some other method?

Regarding the wasp, both pictures are of the same individual, and it is a female. The long process extending from the abdomen is an ovipositor.
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Old 07-08-2006, 07:47 AM
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When Workers first hatch, they dont have much pigment, they have to gain it. IT is simply the same SP's they are called Callow workers.

I find my freshly mated alates after mating flights... and I carry around a test tube where Ever I go just in case! :wink: . As many mating flights of species can vary from time, I generaly wait till morning After a fresh rain. In early spring to about this time of year, but weather being VERY their are still a few sp's waiting to have their sesonal nuptual flights (mating flights). One way to tell Males from females is The Size, Female alates usualy are Larger, as are the heads larger than males. A Simple logic aplys, males will die and not stay alive for long so they have no need for the Head muscles like female alates wich will need them to start to found a colony and chew their food their on.

The species mentioned is probably Solenopesis molesta called Theif ants is very common through out the states and nest right in the fasiniaty of other Ants and steals food and supposedly "eggs" of other ants. But their sizes makes them do this. and They Spray a chemical (kind of like ant mace) when they are threatend! The workers are about 2-3 mm's and the queens 5-6 mm's VERY small ants.

Ohhh thats an Ovipositor! I figured it had something to do with reprodcution I just couldnt tell! :roll:

On another note, hear is a Praying Mantis Nymph. Question are Young mantids called Nymphs?

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 07-08-2006, 08:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nepenthes
On another note, hear is a Praying Mantis Nymph. Question are Young mantids called Nymphs?
I think so. I learned that this is the term for the immature stages of any insect that doesn't undergo complete metamorphosis (i.e., egg, larva, pupa, adult). Nice shot! I love mantids.

You are lucky to get queens to lay. I have collected some in the past but have been unsuccessful at getting them to start colonies.

One interesting fact about alates (at least to me ): I noticed one year that my chickens were eagerly gobbling up alates as they emerged from their nests (which, as you know, they do in great number), whereas normally they completely ignore ants. I mentioned this to a biologist who told me that this is because the alates emerge with much coveted (by chickens) fat reserves, whereas the worker ants are nutritionally not worth the chickens' time...
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Old 07-08-2006, 09:27 AM
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I usualy go for alateas that are on WATER (they will land their in numbers some times thinking its an ok place to start a colony), and alates that dont have any Wings, you can tell by Scars on their sides and the general size difrence from common workers!

Im raising that mantid in doors! and twoards fall im going to let it go so it can breed for me! :roll: and it just shed and is 1/3 bigger than that shot yousee their! The size change is amazing I cant imagine how cramped they must be
shock:
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Old 07-09-2006, 02:29 AM
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Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 07-09-2006, 03:29 AM
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Wow this thread is awesome!

Nepenthes a.k: I'd love to get a few queens but we have no rain here at this time of year... :lol: I do see argentine ant queens alot but have not been able to get them to start colonies...which is pretty sad as they are big pests here. I will be going to a place that usually yields some kind of big any queen in about 2 weeks. Problem is the ones I usually find have wings(flew to lights at night). Any chance of these ones being mated and able to start colonies?
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1.1 Oophaga pumilio 'Isla Cristobal'
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  #57 (permalink)  
Old 07-11-2006, 03:58 PM
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you never know but what I usualy do is put the queen ants in a CD case or a Test tube... and leave them brood other than keeping them moist.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17/al ... e6bc1e.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17/al ... 12877e.jpg

Usualy you can never tell, but So far ive had a 5 brood out of 8 queens caught.

Oh man I just noticed that spider! Is it one of those spiders that Like once it sees a prey below it drops down really fast and Catchs it with the web instead of the old fasioned Make a web and hope for the best?

Cheers
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Old 07-11-2006, 05:36 PM
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Wow,
What crab is that? It appears to have crablets on its abdomen. I wasnít aware that there were species that bypassed the larval stage.
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Instead of keeping more species, why not do more with the species you keep?
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Old 07-11-2006, 11:37 PM
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No what the crab does is cary around the eggs for a while, (the millions upon millions that are in their) What ever ones make it make it, and mature on and survive their until they are able to go out on their own.
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Old 07-12-2006, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nepenthes
No what the crab does is cary around the eggs for a while, (the millions upon millions that are in their) What ever ones make it make it, and mature on and survive their until they are able to go out on their own.
Well, thatís sort of how it usually goes. In fact the females usually carry the eggs until they hatch. Shortly after that they release the pelagic larva to fend for them selves. That crab looks to be carrying fully formed crblets. That is what I was commenting on as being unusual. Most land crabs have to return to the sea. It looks as though that one does not.
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Instead of keeping more species, why not do more with the species you keep?
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Old 07-13-2006, 12:30 AM
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agreed with Grassypeak. It really does look like their are little crabs...If we could get Ben E to reply.

Also, i'm having trouble making sense out of the blue thing in the first of his photos.
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